Architectural Timeline

by Ryan Spera and Javier Luna

MCG Stadium 1853


The Melbourne Cricket Ground (MCG) is an Australian sports stadium located in Yarra Park, Melbourne, Victoria, and is home to the Melbourne Cricket Club.[2][3] It is the 11th-largest stadium in the world, the largest in Australia, the largest in the Southern Hemisphere, the largest stadium for playing cricket, and has the highest light towers at any sporting venue. The MCG is within walking distance of the city centre and is served by the Richmond railway station, Richmond, and the Jolimont railway station, East Melbourne. It is part of the Melbourne Sports and Entertainment Precinct. Built by many architects around the world over 100's of years.

Architect: Cox Architects & Planners

Lambeau Field 1957

Designed by Ellerbe Becket, Lambeau Field is an outdoor athletic stadium in Green Bay, Wisconsin, the home field of the Green Bay Packers of the National Football League. It opened in 1957 as City Stadium, replacing the original City Stadium at East High School as the Packers' home field. Informally known as New City Stadium for its first eight seasons, it was renamed in August 1965 in memory of Packers founder, player, and long-time head coach, Curly Lambeau, who had died two months earlier.

Kauffman Stadium 1973

Kauffman Stadium is a Major League Baseball stadium located in Kansas City, Missouri, and home to the Kansas City Royals of the American League. Together with Arrowhead Stadium, home of the National Football League's Kansas City Chiefs, it is a part of the Truman Sports Complex. Since July 2, 1993, the venue had been known as Kauffman Stadium in honor of the Royals' founding owner, Ewing Kauffman.

Architects:: Kivett and Myers

Rangers Ballpark @ Arlington 1994

Globe Life Park in Arlington is a stadium in Arlington, Texas, located between Dallas and Fort Worth. It is home to the American League's Texas Rangers, and the Texas Rangers Baseball Hall of Fame. It was constructed as a replacement for nearby Arlington Stadium. It was known as The Ballpark in Arlington until May 7, 2004, when Ameriquest bought the naming rights to it and renamed it Ameriquest Field in Arlington. On March 19, 2007, the Rangers severed their relationship with Ameriquest and announced that it would be renamed Rangers Ballpark in Arlington. On February 5, 2014, Globe Life and Accident Insurance Company bought the naming rights to it. Globe Life is owned by Torchmark Corporation, which is based in McKinney, Texas, a northern suburb of Dallas.

Architect: Rod Robbie

Hong Kong Stadium 1994

Hong Kong Stadium is the main sports venue of Hong Kong. Redeveloped from the old Government Stadium, it reincarnated as Hong Kong Stadium in March 1994. It has a maximum seating capacity of 40,000, including 18,257 at the main level, 3,153 at executive level, 18,507 upper level seats and 57 seats for wheelchair users. The stadium is located in So Kon Po, Hong Kong Island, a valley near Causeway Bay. Most international football matches held in Hong Kong are held at this stadium. It is also the location for the Hong Kong Sevens rugby sevens tournament. Hong Kong Stadium also hosted the IRB Rugby World Cup Sevens twice, in 1997 and 2005.

Architect: Populous

Wells Fargo Center 1996

It is the home arena of the Philadelphia Flyers of the National Hockey League, the Philadelphia 76ers of the National Basketball Association, the Philadelphia Wings of the National Lacrosse League, and the Philadelphia Soul of the Arena Football League. The Center was completed in 1996 to replace the Spectrum as the home arena of the Flyers, 76ers, and Wings, on the former site of John F. Kennedy Stadium (originally Philadelphia Municipal Stadium) at a cost of $210 million, largely privately financed (though the city and state helped to pay for the local infrastructure). It is owned by Comcast Spectacor, which also owns the Flyers, and is operated by its arena-management subsidiary, Global Spectrum.

Architect: Ellerbe Becket

Safeco Field 1999

Safeco Field is a retractable roof baseball stadium located in Seattle, Washington. The stadium, owned and operated by the Washington-King County Stadium Authority, is the home stadium of the Seattle Mariners of Major League Baseball (MLB) and has a seating capacity of 47,476 for baseball. It is located in Seattle's SoDo neighborhood near the western terminus of Interstate 90. During the 1990s, the suitability of the Mariners' previous stadium—the Kingdome—as an MLB facility came under doubt, and the team's ownership group threatened to relocate the team. In September 1995, King County voters defeated a ballot measure to secure public funding for a new baseball stadium. Shortly thereafter, the Mariners' first appearance in the MLB postseason and their victory in the 1995 American League Division Series (ALDS) renewed a public desire to keep the team in town. As a result, the Washington State Legislature approved an alternate means of funding for the stadium with public money. The site for the stadium—just south of the Kingdome—was selected in September 1996, and construction began in March 1997. Construction lasted until July 1999, and the stadium hosted its first game on July 15, 1999.

Architect: Dan Meis

Comerica Field 2000

Comerica Park is an open-air ballpark located in Downtown Detroit. It serves as the home of the Detroit Tigers of Major League Baseball, replacing historic Tiger Stadium in 2000. The park is named after Comerica Bank, which was founded in Detroit and was based there when the park opened. Comerica's headquarters have since been moved to Dallas, though the bank still retains a large presence in Detroit. The stadium's seating capacity is 41,681. There is a Detroit People Mover station about a block from the stadium (at Grand Circus Park). Comerica Park sits on the original site of the Detroit College of Law.

Architect: HOK Sport, SHG Inc., Rockwell group

Lincoln Financial Field 2003

Lincoln Financial Field is the home stadium of the National Football League's Philadelphia Eagles and the Temple Owls football team of Temple University. It has a seating capacity of 69,176. It is located in South Philadelphia on Pattison Avenue between 11th and 10th streets, also alongside I-95 as part of the South Philadelphia Sports Complex. Many locals refer to the stadium simply as "The Linc". The stadium opened on August 3, 2003, after two years of construction that began on May 7, 2001, and replaced Veterans Stadium as the Eagles' home stadium. While its total capacity barely changed, the new stadium contains double the number of luxury and wheelchair-accessible seats, along with more modern services. The field's construction included several light emitting diode (LED) video displays, as well as more than 624 feet (190 m) of LED ribbon boards. Unlike the Vet, Lincoln Financial Field never had a jail and currently still doesn't have one. The Linc also plays host to several soccer games each year, and in the past (2005, 2006, 2013) it has played host to the NCAA lacrosse national championship.

Architect: NBBJ

Citizens State Park 2004

Citizens Bank Park is a 43,651-seat baseball park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, part of the South Philadelphia Sports Complex, and home of the Philadelphia Phillies. It is commonly referred to by locals simply as "The Bank" or "CBP". Citizens Bank Park opened on April 3, 2004, and hosted its first regular season baseball game on April 12 of the same year, with the Phillies losing to the Cincinnati Reds, 4–1. The ballpark was built to replace the now-demolished Veterans Stadium (a football/baseball multipurpose facility), and features natural grass and dirt playing field and also features a number of Philadelphia-style food stands, including several which serve cheesesteaks, hoagies, and other regional specialties. The ballpark lies on the northeast corner of the Sports Complex, which includes Lincoln Financial Field, Wells Fargo Center, and Xfinity Live!

Busch Stadium 2006

Busch Stadium is the home of the St. Louis Cardinals, of MLB. The stadium has a seating capacity of 43,975, and contains 3,706 club seats and 61 luxury suites. It replaced Busch Memorial Stadium and occupies a portion of that stadium's former footprint. A commercial area, dubbed Ballpark Village, was built adjacent to the stadium over the remainder of the former stadium's footprint. Designed by Kennedy Architectural Inc.

Architect: Populous

Dubai Cricket Stadium 2008

Dubai International Stadium formerly known as the Dubai Sports City Cricket Stadium is a description of a new multi-purpose stadium in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. It is mainly used for cricket and is one of three stadiums in the country, the other two being Sharjah Cricket Association Stadium and Abu Dhabi Sheikh Zayed Cricket Stadium. It has a capacity of 25,000 spectators, but is expandable to 30,000 spectators. It is a part of the Dubai Sports City in Dubai

Architect: Architekten von Gerkan, Marg und Partner

AT&T Stadium 2009

AT&T Stadium, previously known as Cowboys Stadium, is a city-owned stadium with a retractable roof in Arlington, Texas, United States. It serves as the home of the Dallas Cowboys of the National Football League. It replaced the partially covered Texas Stadium, which opened in 1971 and served as the Cowboys' home through the 2008 season. It was completed on May 27, 2009. The facility can also be used for a variety of other activities outside of its main purpose (professional football) such as concerts, basketball games, college football and high school football contests, soccer matches, and motocross races.

Architect: HKS Inc

Marlin's Park 2012

The stadium is designed in a neomodern form of baseball architecture. Marlins Park was also LEED certified as the greenest MLB park in 2012. The building is the sixth MLB stadium to have a retractable roof. With a seating capacity of 37,442, it is the third-smallest stadium in Major League Baseball by official capacity, and the smallest by actual capacity. Marlins Park is located in Miami, Florida. It is the current home of the Miami Marlins, the city's Major League Baseball franchise. It is located on 17 acres of the former Miami Orange Bowl site in Little Havana, about 2 miles (3 km) west of Downtown. Construction was completed in March 2012, in time for the 2012 season.

Architect: Populous

Levi's Stadium 2014

Levi's Stadium is a football stadium in Santa Clara, California which serves as the current home of the San Francisco 49ers of the National Football League.In 2006, the 49ers initially proposed constructing a new stadium at Candlestick Point in San Francisco, the site of their now-former home, Candlestick Park. The project, which included plans for retail space and housing improvements, was considered to have been of great potential benefit to the nearby historically blighted neighborhood of Hunters Point. After negotiations with the city of San Francisco fell through, the 49ers focused their attention on a site adjacent to their administrative offices and training facility in Santa Clara, a suburb adjacent to San Jose.

Architect: HNTB