Protists

Learn about the 4 types of Protists!

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Euglena

Euglenas are in the Kingdom Protista and the Phylum Euglenophyta. They make their food from photosynthesis and absorbing nutrients. Scroll down below to find more information about the Euglena

How Does It Move?

A protist that uses it's flagellum (a long whip-like structure that helps the euglena move) to move from place to place. The flagellum is in the front end of the euglena and moves itself to move the cell through water.


How Does It Eat?

The Euglena gets it's food from photosynthesis. They all have chloroplasts, green rod like structures that are needed for photosynthesis. For photosynthesis to occur, there needs to be light. To search for light, the euglena uses it's eyespot. The eyespot is red and without it, the chloroplasts can't make food.


How do they Reproduce?

For reproduction, Euglenas go through mitosis. Basically, they split in half and make another identical euglena with the same dna and everything. Reproduction for the Euglenas can only occur if they're well fed and the temperature is warm.


Reaction?

If the euglenas don't have enough light for photosynthesis to occur, it eats other tiny protists, like amoeba and paramecium.

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The Parts of the Euglena

Nucleus

Located in the center of the cell, the nucleus is the control center of the whole cell. It tells the cell what to do. It contains the dna of the cell.


Contractile Vacuole

Star shaped, the contractile vacuole removes any extra water that the cell contains. Without this the cell could explode.


Eyespot

Located in the front of the cell, the eyespot seeks out light for the cell to photosynthesize. Red in color and near the reservoir.


Chloroplasts

Green rod-like structures that are needed in order to photosynthesize. These trap sunlight.


Flagellum

Long whip like structure that the euglena uses to move around.


Cytoplasm

This is the liquid inside a cell that holds all the organelles.


Pellicle

The euglena has a pellicle out outside of the cell membrane. It keeps up the euglena's shape and is pretty flexible.

Vocabulary

Autotrophic

A cell that makes it's own food.


Heterotrophic

A cell that gets its nutrients by feeding on other cells.

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Interesting Facts

  • Euglenas are both autotrophic and heterotrophic. The photosynthesize most of the time, but sometimes when there isn't enough sunlight for food they absorb bugs.
  • Scientists don't know if euglenas are plant or animal.
  • Usually found in ponds, lakes, and puddles.
  • If the euglena didn't have a contractile vacuole, the cell would explode.
  • Euglenas are green because they eat green algae.
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Amoeba

How Does it Get it's Food?

It uses its pseudopods and makes a bubble around its food.


How Does it Move?

It uses it's Cilia


How Does it Reproduce?

Usually it reproduces asexually 2-3 times a day on binary fission. Sometimes it reproduces sexually. It splits itself into smaller copies of itself that has the same dna as it does.


How Does it Respond?

It becomes a cyst, a hard dormant ball. In this case it doesn't need nutrients, at least for a little while.

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Paramecium

How Does it Get it's Food?

It sweeps food into it's oral groove


How Does it Move?

Using it's cilia


How Does it Reproduce?

Asexually it reproduces 2-3 times a day and sometimes reproduces sexually (conjugation)


Reaction?

Eats decaying plant matter if it doesn't have anything else to eat. It also has this danger detector that tell it to go somewhere else if danger approaches. It also has a weapon, the trophozoite that traps a predator.

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paramecium moving

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Volvox

How Does it Get it's Food?

Photosynthesis


How Does it Move?

It has two flagella


How Does it Reproduce?

Daughter Colonies.


How Does it Respond?

Agal colony.

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Volvox Dances