Why is the Electoral College Bogus?

Should it be repealed or amended?

Electoral College

On election day, the Tuesday after the first Monday of November or the "second Tuesday", when registered voters cast their ballot to vote for the next President and Vice President, they are actually voting for electors, not the candidate itself, known as the electoral college. It is these electors, chosen by the people, who elect the chief executive into office. In each state, there are a number of electors equal to the combined total of the state’s Senate and House of Representatives delegates, which we vote elect. The total number of electors are 538; that means only those votes count toward the presidential election and our's does not. So, in a way our vote does count, but when it comes down to the presidential election, not really. Its like we don't even get a fair vote or our vote doesn't count. This is unfair and needs to be amended. Although, in some extensive circumstances we can out-vote the electors, in a way. If a state gets 100% of the popular vote for presidential candidate A, but the electors vote for a different candidate then the vote goes to presidential candidate A by popular vote.

Does my vote count?

When you first think of the Electoral College, it can be very confusing and with a complicated process. We the people actually do not vote the president into office, the Electoral College does. Thats a massively unfair advantage left to the political parties of the states. Why people don't vote is plain and simple, one is there vote does not count and they're getting cheated by their country, and number two is that whoever the people wants for president "the popular vote", when it comes down to it, the college can still overrule the final vote or make the final decision.


(1) learnnc.org. Does my vote count? Understanding the Electoral College. ND. Web. 29 March. 2016

What is the Electoral College?

The Electoral college is a process not a place. Many of you are thinking, what is the Electoral College? The electors, a combination of house of representatives and senators, decides the next president of the United States. The Electoral College was established as a compromise between election of the President by a vote in Congress and election of the President by a popular vote of its qualified citizens. If you ask me, that completely does not make any sense....even 200 years later.


Below is a video describing the Electoral College and how it functions


(2) Archves.gov. Electoral College and the National Archives, ND. Web. 10 March. 2016

Electoral College and the National Archives

How the Electoral College Works?

(3) youtube.com. How the Electoral College Works. 7 Nov 2011. Video. 26 April. 2016
How the Electoral College Works

Reasons to get rid of the Electoral College!!!

The Electoral College holds all the cards here. They can vote for
whoever they choose and it is fair.....no!! Here are some reasons why we
need to get rid of the Electoral College. The first reason is every vote
will count; if you ask me, every vote should count that way its fair and
constitutional. Another reason is that it will force candidates to
campaign everywhere; well before the election, you see candidates
campaigning in states and the reason why those candidates are campaigning
is to raise money for their individual campaign. My opinion is that they
should campaign all over the place or in other words nationwide, instead
of specific states and/or locations, to share and debate their ideas to
the public of how it would and/or may impact the nation's economy.


(4) ventrellaquest.com. Top 5 reasons to get rid of the Electoral College. 9 April 2013. Web. 19 April 2016

Distribution of Electoral Votes

Electoral votes are allocated based on the Census.

The allocations below are based on the 2010 Census.

They are effective for the 2012, 2016, and 2020 presidential elections.

Total Electoral Votes: 538; Majority Needed to Elect: 270


There are 538 electoral votes in the congressional delegation. Each elector is assigned to a state other than their residency. Each state has one or more House of Representatives and at least 2 senators, where there may be no more greater than 55 electors.


(5) Archves.gov. Distribution of Electoral Votes, 10 Dec. 2010. Web. 23 Fab. 2016

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What happens when theres a tie of the Electoral votes?

Well, some say its possible but it has rarely happened (and only once). In 1800, the tie breaking vote by the House chose Thomas Jefferson as president over Aaron Burr, his running mate - a paring so awkward that the nation quickly passed a constitutional amendment, the 12th amendment, to change the system to allow electors to vote separately for president and vice president. First of all, a 269-269 Electoral tie is when the Senators and House of Representatives vote half and half or in other words, the 538 votes were "split. Although, it was first addressed by Article II of the Constitution, if there were a tie in the Electoral College we would follow the process outlined in the 12th amendment (ratified in 1804). "The House shall choose immediately, by ballot, the President" and "the Senate shall choose the Vice President". That means that all the representatives within a given state vote as a bloc, and each state has one vote. The majority votes within that state bloc determines its vote. As soon as the votes have been counted, the winner of president and vice president will be announced.


(6A) blog.constitutioncenter.org. An Electoral College tie, explained. 6 Nov 2012. Web. 7 April 2016.

Hey...what about a tie of the 269-269 tie?

But, what if there is another tie such as a 25-25? Well.....this has never happened, though it could. The possibilities of this actually happening are drastically small because first of all there needs to be a 269 tie in the Electoral College, and even those odds are not that high. By any chance, if it does happen then, those guidelines are clearly stated in the 12th amendment: "if the House of Representatives shall not choose a President whenever the right choice shall devolve upon them, before the fourth day of March next following, then the Vice-President (currently Joe Biden) shall act as President, as in case of the death or disability of the President." The section was later superseded by the 20th amendment, which moved the start of the new session of Congress from March to early January. On the other hand, if the Senate is unable to break a tie for the vice president, according to the Presidential Succession Act of 1947, the speaker of the house serves as acting president (currently Joe Boehner).


(6B) blog.constitutioncenter.org. An Electoral College tie, explained. 6 Nov 2012. Web. 7 April 2016.

So, why is there an Electoral College anyway?

The Electoral College was created for two reasons. The first purpose was to create a buffer between population and the selection of a President. The second as part of the structure of the government that gave extra power to the smaller states.The first reason that the founders created the Electoral College is hard to understand today. The founding fathers were afraid of direct election to the Presidency. They feared a tyrant could manipulate public opinion and come to power. Hamilton wrote in the Federalist Papers:

It was equally desirable, that the immediate election should be made by men most capable of analyzing the qualities adapted to the station, and acting under circumstances favorable to deliberation, and to a judicious combination of all the reasons and inducements which were proper to govern their choice. A small number of persons, selected by their fellow-citizens from the general mass, will be most likely to possess the information and discernment requisite to such complicated investigations. It was also peculiarly desirable to afford as little opportunity as possible to tumult and disorder. This evil was not least to be dreaded in the election of a magistrate, who was to have so important an agency in the administration of the government as the President of the United States. But the precautions which have been so happily concerted in the system under consideration, promise an effectual security against this mischief.


Hamilton and the other founders believed that the electors would be able to insure that only a qualified person becomes President. They believed that with the Electoral College no one would be able to manipulate the citizenry. It would act as check on an electorate that might be duped. Hamilton and the other founders did not trust the population to make the right choice. The founders also believed that the Electoral College had the advantage of being a group that met only once and thus could not be manipulated over time by foreign governments or others.


(7) history central.com. Why the Electoral College. 1996-2015. Web. 26 April. 2016

Primary Elections Explained

"We the People" actually vote for the presidential nominee in the primaries, which happens every 4 years. The Electoral College takes no part in this. In the primaries, there're usually like 3 to 4 candidates left standing. Meaning, the other candidates dropped out very early before the primaries and while campaigning. Besides the current president, there were a substantial number of candidates even for Republican and Democrat when this all started. The primaries are held in March of the same year as the election.


(8) youtube.com. Primary Elections Explained. 13 Feb 2012. Video. 26 April. 2016

Primary Elections Explained

Trouble with the Electoral College?

(9) youtube.com. The Trouble with the Electoral College? Understanding the Electoral College. 7 Nov 2011. Video. 26 April. 2016
The Trouble with the Electoral College

Why this is unconstitutional?

Millions and millions of people go to cast their ballot for a select presidential candidate and they think that they're actually voting for them into office. Right? No...dead wrong!!! They do not actually vote for the next president. Some of those millions of people don't even cast a ballot because they think that their vote does not count, the are not appreciated fairly as a citizen of the United States. Here below are some reasons why the system is unconstitutional and should be abolished?


(10) greengarageblog.org. 10 Far-Reaching Pros and Cons of the Electoral College. 2015. Web. 17 Mar. 2016


* It isolates people from the rest of the country.


Why......


This is because the popular vote isn’t considered valid. This makes people feel that they didn’t have a say on the selection of the president. This forces some of the citizens to not participate in the elections.


* It could produce a president whom the majority of Americans do not exactly fancy.


Why......


This is because the principle of the Electoral College undermines the popular vote. Smaller states will have a larger percentage of electoral vote because the minimum number of Electoral College votes for every state is three


* It allows the presidential election to be decided by the House of Representatives.


Why......


Again, this makes people feel as if their votes are not deemed important. This is what will happen when there is no majority of votes during the election.


* It is complicated and discourages people from voting.


Why......


Without Electoral College, getting the popular vote simply means a win. But with the electoral college, a candidate must get 270 votes from electors alone. This discourage people from participating in the polls

Look at this unfair advantage

First map: Electoral Vote


Second Map: Popular Vote


Basically to explain it is that Mitt Romney, former governor of Massachusetts, should have won as result of the popular vote vs. the winning presidential candidate Barack Obama, now the current president, as a result of the Electoral vote.


(11) weeklyworldnews. Presidential Results. NA. Image. 17 Mar. 2016

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The possible President of 2017......Oh god!!!

If you don't make the smart decision, this guy could be the next president of the United States. If trump gets elected, he would ruin this country and destroy the earth by creating world warIII because he can't keep his mouth shut. Please don't let this happen!!
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References

(1) learnnc.org. Does my vote count? Understanding the Electoral College. ND. Web. 29 March. 2016


(2) Archves.gov. Electoral College and the National Archives, ND. Web. 10 March. 2016


(3) youtube.com. How the Electoral College Works. 7 Nov 2011. Video. 26 April. 2016


(4) ventrellaquest.com. Top 5 reasons to get rid of the Electoral College. 9 April 2013. Web. 19 April 2016


(5) Archves.gov. Distribution of Electoral Votes, 10 Dec. 2010. Web. 23 Feb. 2016


(6A) blog.constitutioncenter.org. An Electoral College tie, explained. 6 Nov 2012. Web. 7 April 2016.


(6B) blog.constitutioncenter.org. An Electoral College tie, explained. 6 Nov 2012. Web. 7 April 2016.


(7) history central.com. Why the Electoral College. 1996-2015. Web. 26 April. 2016


(8) youtube.com. Primary Elections Explained. 13 Feb 2012. Video. 26 April. 2016


(9) youtube.com. The Trouble with the Electoral College? Understanding the Electoral College. 7 Nov 2011. Video. 26 April. 2016


(10) greengarageblog.org. 10 Far-Reaching Pros and Cons of the Electoral College. 2015. Web. 17 Mar. 2016


(10) weeklyworldnews. Presidential Results. NA. Image. 17 Mar. 2016