Rohypnol

A medication that doubles as an Illegal drug.

Classification

Rohypnol is also known as flunitrazepam a CNS (Central Nervous System) Depressant classified under Benzodiazepine.

Use

It is usually swallowed in a colorless, tasteless, and odorless pills, but it can also be grounded up and snorted. It is not approved for medical use in the United States, but it is used for treating insomnia outside the country.

Physical Effects

- Muscle relaxation

- Slurred speech

- Headaches

- Respiration depression

- Loss of motor of skills.

Psychological Effects

- Drowsiness

- Sleep

- Decreased anxiety

- Amnesia

- Increased or decreased reaction time

- Impaired mental functions

Cost

Most of the time it cost at least 2 to 5 dollars per dosage but it can also sometimes be anywhere between 10 to 30 dollars.

How It Enters The Country

Its usual smuggled in from other countries like Mexico.

Schedule

It's a schedule IV, but penalties for being in possession, trafficking, or distributing Rohypnol is similar to that of a schedule one. It's illegal to manufacture, sale, use, or import.

Recent Legislation

Congress created the Drug-Induced Rape Act of 1996 to make anyone using Rohypnol that commit sexual assault have a more severe penalty.

Prevalence

It's mostly unknown because usually it's not kept tracked of, but 4 million dosage were brought into the United States from Mexico.

Potential For Addiction

Can develop a physical dependence if taken on a regular bases.

Treatment Options

3 to 5 days in a inpatient detoxification program with 24/7 monitoring, and the management of withdrawal symptoms since withdrawal symptoms for Rohypnol can be life threatening.

Resources

"Congress Considers Legislation Targeting Rohypnol®, the "Date Rape" Drug." NDSN. N.p., n.d. Web. 3 May 2015. http://ndsn.org/SUMMER96/ROHYPNOL.html.

"DrugFacts: Club Drugs (GHB, Ketamine, and Rohypnol)." National Institute on Drug Abuse. N.p., n.d. Web. 03 May 2015. http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/club-drugs-ghb-ketamine-rohypnol.

"Drugs of Abuse 2011 Edition A DEA Resource Guide." Drug Enforcement Administration. N.p., n.d. Web. 3 May 2015. <http%3A%2F%2Fwww.dea.gov%2Fpr%2Fmultimedia-library%2Fpublications%2Fdrug_of_abuse.pdf%23page%3D56>.