Pride and Prejudice Graffiti Wall

Chapters 18-22 by Katie Neill

Money

Different social classes


I have been most highly gratified indeed, my dear sir. Such very superior dancing is not often seen. It is evident that you belong to the first circles. Allow me to say, however, that your fair partner does not disgrace you, and that I must hope to have this pleasure often repeated, especially when a certain desirable event, my dear Eliza (glancing at her sister and Bingley) shall take place (Austen 1813, pg. 70)


Picture - Money. (n.d.). Retrieved November 18, 2015, from http://youthvoices.net/discussion/money-2

Wedding Dress

charlotte marrying Mr. collins


Engaged to Mr. Collins! My dear Charlotte--impossible! (Austen 1813, pg. 94)


Picture - Vintage Fashion Guild: May 2010. (n.d.). Retrieved November 18, 2015, from http://vintagefashionguild.blogspot.com/2010_05_01_archive.html?_sm_au_=iVVL7TF1ZZNTr0PF

Ring

collins proposed to Elizabeth


that it is usual with young ladies to reject the addresses of the man whom they secretly mean to accept, when he first applies for their favour; and that sometimes the refusal is repeated a second, or even a third time (Austen 1813, pg. 81)


Picture - 1700s Georgian Diamond Heart Engagement Ring. (n.d.). Retrieved November 18, 2015, from https://www.pinterest.com/pin/38139928068432638/

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Embarrassment

family acting at the ball


Mary, though pretending not to hear, was somewhat disconcerted; and Elizabeth, sorry for her, and sorry for her father's speech, was afraid her anxiety had done no good. Others of the party were now applied to (Austen 1813, pg. 76)


Picture - Israel as a public embarrassment. (n.d.). Retrieved November 18, 2015, from http://972mag.com/israel-as-a-public-embarrassment/77025/

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Piano

mary playing at the ball


But not long was the interval of tranquillity; for, when supper was over, singing was talked of, and

she had the mortification of seeing Mary, after very little entreaty, preparing to oblige the company. By many significant looks and silent entreaties, did she endeavour to prevent such a proof of complaisance, but in vain (Austen 1813, pg. 76)


Picture - Piano. (n.d.). Retrieved November 18, 2015, from http://globe-views.com/dreams/piano.html

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Anger

Mrs. Bennet when Elizabeth rejects Mr. Collins


But, depend upon it, Mr. Collins," she added, "that Lizzy shall be brought to reason. I will speak to her about it directly. She is a very headstrong, foolish girl, and does not know her own interest but I will _make_ her know it (Austen 1813, pg. 83)


Picture - Anger...The Silent Killer - Be You International. (2015, January 18). Retrieved November 18, 2015, from http://www.beyouinternational.com/beyoublog/anger-silent-killer/

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Sad

Till Elizabeth entered the drawing-room at Netherfield, and looked in
vain for Mr. Wickham among the cluster of red coats there assembled, a doubt of his being present had never occurred to her (Austen 1813, pg. 67)


Picture - Sad Robot Song - [1080p] - [HD] - [LYRICS]. (n.d.). Retrieved November 18, 2015, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cf7Ie6PMZJk

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Letter

miss Bingley's letter to jane


This is from Caroline Bingley; what it contains has surprised me a good deal. The whole party have left Netherfield by this time, and are on
their way to town--and without any intention of coming back again. You shall hear what she says (Austen 1813, pg. 88)


Picture - Chandler Family Association - DNA Group 8 - Gilmorton Chandlers in the 1700s. (n.d.). Retrieved November 18, 2015, from http://chandlerfamilyassociation.org/dna_group_8_letters.html

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Balls

chapter 18 takes place here


When those dances were over, she returned to Charlotte Lucas, and was in conversation with her, when she found herself suddenly addressed by Mr. Darcy who took her so much by surprise in his application for her hand, that,
without knowing what she did, she accepted him (Austen 1813, pg. 68)


Picture - Vertours. (n.d.). Retrieved November 18, 2015, from http://www.vertours.com/incoming/id/410.html

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Loud

Mrs. bennet talking about jane and Mr. Bingley to Lady Lucas


Her mother's thoughts she plainly saw were bent the same way, and she determined not to venture near her, lest she might hear too much. When they sat down to supper, therefore, she considered it a most unlucky perverseness which placed them within one of each other; and deeply was she vexed to find that her mother was talking to that one person (Lady Lucas) freely, openly, and of nothing else but her expectation that Jane would soon
be married to Mr. Bingley (Austen 1813, pg. 75)


Picture - GENKAKU-AGAIN (Adam fisher). (n.d.). Retrieved November 18, 2015, from http://genkaku-again.blogspot.com/2013/09/loud.html?_sm_au_=iVVL7TF1ZZNTr0PF