ENVIRONMENTAL ADVOCACY

COMM/ENST 375, SUMMER SESSION I

Messages about climate change, energy insecurity, poverty and pollution proliferate in our daily lives.


Every day, scientists, politicians, and environmental activists mount more evidence about forthcoming ecological crises. How are these messages created and disseminated, and how do the publics to which they are addressed give meaning to them? How do debates over the legitimacy of global warming claims alter our ability to respond to such coming events? COMM/ENST 375, Environmental Advocacy, studies the ways in which communicative processes about the environment define issues, solve problems, and shape communities and worldviews. At the end of the course, students will be better able to analyze, interpret, and respond to messages about the environment.*


*This interdisciplinary class welcomes students and perspectives from all disciplines and departments. Students who wish to better understand and/or craft their own personal advocacy are especially welcome.

Interactive, Engaged Learning

COMM 375 situates students as active stakeholders in the construction and resolution of environmental issues. Through engaged-learning assignments (e.g., touring and analyzing campus LEED-certified buildings, individual lived-experience projects) students will have the opportunity to apply diverse environmental perspectives to an issue of local, national, or international import.

UNDERSTAND ENVIRONMENTAL MOVEMENTS AND STRATEGIES FOR RESISTANCE

A key component in the study of environmental advocacy is the consideration of affiliated movements and strategies for resistance. As such, this course will study mainstream environmental movements, green capitalism, environmental justice campaigns, international environmental coalitions, guerilla tactics, and ecofeminist strategies. Given the employment of new media technologies in environmental advocacy, these technologies will be a focus of study, including an investigation into how digital and social media function variably as sites of information dissemination and as potential sites of resistance.

Monday-Friday, 1:15-2:45 @ Mitchell Hall 205

FOR MORE INFORMATION

contact: Heather S. Woods @ hswoods@live.unc.edu
or click here!