Advisory Time

Using relationships to help students succeed

Your Questions and Concerns


- Will this time essentially be wasted time?


- If we have no clear goal, how do we know if we have achieved anything?


- Will there be a defined curriculum?


- But I am not trained as a counselor...


- Will I be evaluated on my advisory work?

The Middle School Model


- The Middle School Movement began in the 1960's (5).


- Middle school students are different physically, cognitively, and psychologically from their elementary and high school cohorts (3)


- Transition to and through middle school involves social, emotional, vocational, and moral development" (5).


- Many studies show that student's self-perception and level of motivation change (3)


- Each student assigned one adult contact (3)


- Teaming is an essential element (3)





What is Advisory?


- "Simple concept: each child should be known well by at least one caring adult in the school" (8)


- "Every student should have an advocate" (2)


- Based on the premise that "guidance is everybody's responsibility, that there are not enough trained counselors to handle all of a school's guidance needs, and that teacher-based guidance is an important supplement to school counseling" (6)


- "Student-centered, affective education" (6)


- Help students "[navigate] his or her way through the emotional turbulence of this critical stage" (8)


- "49% of all middle schools have implemented a teacher-advisor program" (6)

Goals of Advisory


- "Individual attention to students" (2)


- "Opportunity to belong" (2)


- "Opportunities for social development" (2)


- Develop "interpersonal communication skills" (2)


- "Assisting students with academic problems" (2)


- "Small, caring communities of learners" (2)


- "Mutually respectful and meaningful relationships" (2)


- Positive involvement between and among teachers, administrators, and students (2)


- "Providing an adult advocate for each student in the school" (2)


- Promoting positive school climate" (2)


Roles

Administrators


- Provide leadership and organization (7)


- Provide time (7)

---- 20 - 40 uninterrupted minutes (2)


- Provide training for teachers (4)


- On- going PD for teachers (brown)

---- Active listening and other basic counseling skills (6)

---- "Relationship building, assertiveness skills, and group facilitation skills" (6)


- Decide whether teachers will be evaluated on advisory (8)

School Counselors

- Develop curriculum for Advisory (6)


- Other Options:


---1) Consultative Role:

--------a) Counselors would not have their own advisory groups

--------b) They would be available to consult with teachers (6)


---2) Expert Direct Service Provider Role:

--------a) Counselors have their own advisory group

--------b) Advantage: Share common ground with teachers

--------c) Disadvantage: Limited use of the counselors' training (6)


---3) Hybrid

--------a) Start the year without a group

--------b) Pick up difficult students through out the year

Teachers


- Be an adisor for 10-15 students (2)


- Get to know your advisory students well both academically and socially (8)


- Contact person for parents and guardians (8)


- Advocate for your advisees during team meetings (8)


- Alert grade level counselor of particular needs of advisees (8)


- Support your colleagues as they implement this program (5)


- Teacher investment makes or breaks the advisory program (4)

Students


- Participate in advisory activities


- Keep a portfolio of advisory activities (4)


- Suggest topics of interest to the curriculum planning committee

Specific Activities

Social


- Problem solving skills (6)


- Interpersonal skills (6)


- Conflict resolution (6)


- School spirit (6)


- Citizenship (2)


- Community service (2)


Emotional


- Identity development (7)


- Self-respect (2)


- Coping skills (2)

Academic


- Goal setting (2)


- Study skills (6)


- Organizational and time mangament skills (2)


- Test-taking strategies (2)


- Monitoring academic progress (7)

Benefits


- Better relationships between teachers and students (1)


- Improves students' self-concept (2)


- Increased motivation (1)


- Academic achievement (1)


- Enhanced school climate (6) and culture (7)


- Reduction in dropouts (2)


- Improves communication to parents (1)



Conclusion


- One new piece is not enough (1)


- However, we hope that less students will fall through the cracks (8)


- Maybe someday we will talk about the 4th R -- Relationships! (6)

References


1) Andrews, P. G., Caskey, M. M., & Anfara, V. A., Jr. (2007). Research summary: Characteristics of exemplary schools for young adolescents. Retrieved April 3, 2013, from http://www.nmsa.org/Research/ResearchSummaries/ExemplarySchools/tabid/256/Default.aspx


2) Anfara, V. A., Jr. (2006). Research summary: Advisory programs. Retrieved April 3, 2013, from http://www.nmsa.org/Research/ResearchSummaries/AdvisoryPrograms/tabid/812/Default.aspx


3) Braddock, J.H. and McPartland, J.M. (1993). Review of research in education chapter 4: Education of early adolescents. Review of Research in Education 19(135).


4) Boorstein, G. (1997, January 1). A study of advisory.


5) Coleman, M. (2001). Middle schools: New trends and issues. Gifted Child Today, 24(4), 20-21.


6) Gallassi, J. P., & Gulledge, S. A. (1997). The middle school counselor and teacher-advisor programs. Professional School Counseling, 1(2), 55.


7) Johnson, B. (2009). Linchpins or lost time: Creating effective advisories. Horace, 25(2).


8) Wilson, C. (1998, January). The real meaning of middle school advisory programs. Contemporary Education. p. 100.