Barack Obama

The First Black President of the United States

Early Life

Obama was born in Hawaii, United States. His father was a black man from Kenya and his mother was a white woman from Kansas.



Obama attended school at Hawaii's top prep academy, Punahou School. From there, Obama went to Columbia University, where he became interested in community activism.


He went to Harvard Law School, where he became the first African-American president of the prestigious Harvard Law Review.



"Barack Obama." Gale Biography in Context. Detroit: Gale, 2004. Biography in Context. Web. 4 May 2016

Getting Involved

Obama prevailed as election results were tallied; as the electoral votes were announced on the evening of November 4, 2008, it was clear that the Illinois senator would become the next president. Obama delivered his victory speech just before midnight to thousands of supporters in Chicago's Grant Park. He thanked his supporters around the country--Americans of all backgrounds, races, and religions--and declared that he would help the country face its present and future problems.


On the December of 2008, President-elect Obama had chosen many members of his administration and was at work on important national issues well ahead of his inauguration on January 20, 2009. Once the festivities of his swearing-in had concluded, Obama turned his attention to the big problems facing the country; he began to address a host of issues including the economic downturn, the healthcare situation, and a nation at war.


"Barack Obama." Gale Biography in Context. Detroit: Gale, 2004. Biography in Context. Web. 9 May 2016.

Choices and Results

Continuing the busy rhythm of the last year, 2010 presented ups and downs for Obama. In January, a massive earthquake struck the impoverished nation of Haiti, and the President pledged his support to the millions of people wounded and displaced by the catastrophe.


In late April of 2010, the BP oil spill in the American Gulf region put pressure on the Obama Administration to react, with some in the press comparing the event to Hurricane Katrina. Obama's administration stated that the White House would begin a criminal investigation for the BP oil spill, and the president later announced that BP would establish a $20 billion donation for victims of the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.


"Barack Obama." Gale Biography in Context. Detroit: Gale, 2004. Biography in Context. Web. 9 May 2016.

In His/Her Words

Change will not come if we wait for some other person or some other time. We are the ones we've been waiting for. We are the change that we seek.

Barack Obama


On every front there are clear answers out there that can make this country stronger, but we're going to break through the fear and the frustration people are feeling. Our job is to make sure that even as we make progress, that we are also giving people a sense of hope and vision for the future.

Barack Obama

Aftermath

Obama is still president and helping out everywhere and everyone.

Words for Him/Her

I am extremely ecstatic about the presidency of Barack Obama. I think he is paving the way for young African-American men like myself. I have very high expectations for Obama, and I am extremely hopeful that he will bring great lasting change not just to America, but to the entire world.
Texas Battle

Annotated Bibliography

1. "Barack Obama." Gale Biography in Context. Detroit: Gale, 2004. Biography in Context. Web. 4 May 2016.

Explain the source. Here is why you chose it.


2. http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/b/barackobam677271.html

Here is the source. Why I chose it.


3. http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/e/elizabethg481713.html?src=t_barack_obama

This is a quote. Why I chose it.


4. "Barack Obama." Contemporary Black Biography. Vol. 74. Detroit: Gale, 2009. Biography in Context. Web. 11 May 2016.

this is my source here is where i explain it. why i chose it.