The Louisiana Purchase 1803

Included land from the Mississippi River to Rocky Mountains

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Background Information

In the beginning of the 17th century, France started settling in the Mississippi Valley. France had more established settlements than any other country in the United States. After the French and Indian War, France gave the majority of the territory to Great Britain. The United States as under the control of Jefferson and France was under the control of Napoleon. The Louisiana Purchase is an agreement between France and United States for France to sell the United States their the land. The United States paid $15 million dollars for the 828,000 acres of land. The land cost three cents per acre. The United States needed control of the Mississippi river for importing and exporting goods out of New Orleans.

Why?

The United States wished to gain territory to better themselves economically. The advantages to gaining this land would be having the Mississippi river, port of New Orleans, and reach Manifest Destiny. The French agreed to selling the land to the United States because France needed money for the cost of the war.
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The Treaty

The Treaty of 1818 put the northern boundary of the Louisiana Purchase at the 49th parallel and provided for a ten-year joint occupation of the Oregon Territory with Britain, without a surrender of rights and claims by neither Britain nor America.

Facts

The territory gained is now fifteen states.

The territory belonged to Spain before it did to France.

The majority of the land was unexplored wilderness.

This purchase was the largest amount of land bought at once by United States, nearly doubling the country's size.

Napoleon's brother tried to talking him out of selling the land.

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Works Cited

"Louisiana Purchase." History.com. A+E Networks, 2009. Web. 3 Dec. 2015. <http://www.history.com/ topics/louisiana-purchase>.

"Louisiana Purchase." Monticello. N.p., n.d. Web. 3 Dec. 2015. <https://www.monticello.org/site/ <jefferson/louisiana-purchase>.
"Louisiana Purchase and Lewis and Clark." Shmoop. N.p., n.d. Web. 3 Dec. 2015. <http://www.shmoop.com/louisiana-purchase-lewis-clark/robert-livingston.html>.

Chase Matzen