The Boston Tea Party

By: Admir Jahic

Background Info of The Boston Tea Party

The Boston Tea Party happened on December 16, 1773. It was the dumping of millions of dollars of British Tea in the Boston harbor that lasted for about three hours on a winter night between 7:00 - 10:00 PM. The Tea Party happened at the Griffin's Wharf in Boston. This is where the three ships (Beaver, Dartmouth, Eleanor) whose tea was dumped were docked at. However, the location doesn't exist anymore due to large landfills destroying the area. The event was organized by the Sons of Liberty who were led by Samuel Adams. Some other important members of the group were John Adams, John Hancock, and Paul Revere. The event itself was done by approximately by 116 documented participants. They dressed up as American Indians to hide their identities. Also, it was an act of defiance to the British to show the American colonists didn't consider themselves as British subjects but Americans. Most of them were anonymous and many came from all different types of races. Majority were English, but there were African Americans, Portuguese, French, Scottish, and Irish.

Significance

The Tea Act of 1773 didn't put a new tax on tea, but it actually ended up lowering the cost of it. It gave a tax break for the East India Tea company which was the the importer of the tea for the colonists. However, they were being outmatched and losing money because of tea that was smuggled in by the colonial merchants. The act was intended for the British to get the colonists to buy their imported tea because it was cheaper and you got more for your bargain. The colonists were already angered by the previous heavy taxes and ended portraying this as taxation without representation. Now, with the angry colonists getting a hold of the British cargo on the three ships that imported tea, they would dump it into the Boston harbor and it would be known as The Boston Tea Party. The Boston Tea Party was one of the last events to occur before the American Revolution along with The Stamp Act, The Sugar Act, The Townshend Acts, and The Boston Massacre. It ultimately led to America being free from British rule.

5 Interesting Facts

1. There was about 92,000 pounds of tea thrown in the Boston Harbor.

2. There was a second Boston Tea Party on March 1774 where 60 men disguised where the men dumped 30 chests of tea in the harbor.

3. Many of the Boston Tea Party participants kept it a secret that they participated all the way until death.

4. Majority of American colonists drank 2-3 cups of tea everyday. Ultimately it would be 2 million pounds of tea for 3 million colonists a year.

5. In total of 342 chests were thrown overboard during The Boston Tea Party.

Key People

Most of the participants of The Boston Tea Party were unknown. However, some famous names of people who participated were Paul Revere, Thomas Crafts, Samuel Cooper, and David Kinnison. Paul Revere was famous for many things such as his night ride on April 18, 1775 to warn the Boston people that the British were coming. He was also a master silversmith and used these skills to support his family. Thomas Craft was a painter tradesman and soon would be a colonel during the Revolutionary War. Samuel Cooper was a member of the Sons of Liberty, participated in the Tea Party when he was 16, and would fight in the first battle of the Revolutionary War of Lexington-Concord. David Kinnison was the last survivor of The Boston Tea Party and died at the age of 115. He also was involved in the Revolutionary War.
Boston Tea Party
Boston Tea Party 1773 - 5 Minute History lesson - Quick Summary

Works Cited

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"The Complete List of Participants." Boston Tea Party Historical Society. Boston Tea Party Historical Society, 2008. Web. 03 Dec. 2015.


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"Boston Tea Party | Publish with Glogster!" Glogster. Glogster, n.d. Web. 03 Dec. 2015.


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