Charmaine

song written by Ernö Rapée, with lyrics by Lew Pollack.

Charmaine

"Charmaine" is a popular song written by Ernö Rapée, with lyrics by Lew Pollack. The song was written in 1926 and published in 1927. However, Desmond Carrington on his BBC Radio 2 programme marked the song's writing as being in 1913.

The song was originally in waltz time, but later versions were in common time.

The song was originally composed for the 1926 silent movie What Price Glory?, and most notably, the best-selling version, recorded by Guy Lombardo & his Orchestra, spent seven weeks at the #1 position in 1927.[1] It was also featured in the movie Two Girls and a Sailor. It was recorded by the Harry James orchestra in 1944.

An instrumental version arranged by Ronald Binge and performed by the Mantovani orchestra was his first hit on the United States charts in 1951. This recording was released by London Records as catalog number 1020. It first reached the Billboard charts on November 9, 1951 and lasted 19 weeks on the chart, peaking at #10.[2]

Another recording, by Gordon Jenkins' orchestra, with a vocal by Bob Carroll, also charted in 1951. This recording was released by Decca Records as catalog number 27859.[3] It first reached the Billboard magazine charts on December 7, 1951 and lasted 1 week on the chart, at #26.[2]

The Bachelors' version reached #5 in the British charts in 1963.[4]

A 1952 arrangement of "Charmaine" by Billy May and His Orchestra reached # 17 on the Billboard charts. The single was May's biggest hit under his own name.[5]

"Charmaine" is one of many popular songs whose lyrics use a "Bluebird of happiness" as a symbol of cheer: "I wonder, when bluebirds are mating, will you come back again?"

Charmaine

"Charmaine" is a popular song written by Ernö Rapée, with lyrics by Lew Pollack. The song was written in 1926 and published in 1927. However, Desmond Carrington on his BBC Radio 2 programme marked the song's writing as being in 1913.

The song was originally in waltz time, but later versions were in common time.

The song was originally composed for the 1926 silent movie What Price Glory?, and most notably, the best-selling version, recorded by Guy Lombardo & his Orchestra, spent seven weeks at the #1 position in 1927.[1] It was also featured in the movie Two Girls and a Sailor. It was recorded by the Harry James orchestra in 1944.

An instrumental version arranged by Ronald Binge and performed by the Mantovani orchestra was his first hit on the United States charts in 1951. This recording was released by London Records as catalog number 1020. It first reached the Billboard charts on November 9, 1951 and lasted 19 weeks on the chart, peaking at #10.[2]

Another recording, by Gordon Jenkins' orchestra, with a vocal by Bob Carroll, also charted in 1951. This recording was released by Decca Records as catalog number 27859.[3] It first reached the Billboard magazine charts on December 7, 1951 and lasted 1 week on the chart, at #26.[2]

The Bachelors' version reached #5 in the British charts in 1963.[4]

A 1952 arrangement of "Charmaine" by Billy May and His Orchestra reached # 17 on the Billboard charts. The single was May's biggest hit under his own name.[5]

"Charmaine" is one of many popular songs whose lyrics use a "Bluebird of happiness" as a symbol of cheer: "I wonder, when bluebirds are mating, will you come back again?"

Charmaine by Mantovani 1951