Chapter 5 Vocabulary

By: Rachel Findlay, Cassie Hagen

Ebonics

Dialect spoken by some African Americans.

Ex. Specifically spoken in The American South and urban areas in America.

British Recieved Pronunciation (BRP)

The dialect of English associated with upper-class Britons living in London and now considered standard in the United Kingdom.

Ex: spoken as the standard dialect in the UK

Ideograms

The system of writing used in China and other East Asian countries in which each symbol represents an idea or a concept rather than a specific sounds, as is the case with letters in English.

Ex: Chinese writing

Spanglish

A combination of Spanish and English spoken by Hispanic Americans.

Ex: Spanglish is common in the South-western USA, near Mexico.

Isolated Language

A language that is unrelated to any other languages and therefore not attached to any language family.

Ex: Korean

Lingu franca

A language mutually understood and commonly used in trade by people who have different native languages.

Ex: In Africa, Swahili is used as a lingu franca.

Pidgin Language

A firm of speech that adopts the simplified grammar and limited vocabulary of a lingu franca; used for communications among speakers of two different languages.

Ex: The major languages of the world are English, French and Portugese.

Denglish

A combination of German and English.

Ex: Used by foreign exchange students from America to Germany.

Vulgar Latin

A form of Latin used in daily conversation by ancient Romans as opposed to the standard dialect, which was used for official documents.

Ex: all of he Romance lanugages came from Vulgar Latin.

Franglais

A term used by the French for English words that have entered the French language.

Ex: Je Avis driver downtown means I'm going to drive downtown.