The Roanoke Sound

Why Estuaries are Important

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The Roanoke Sound

The Roanoke sound is located in the outer banks. The sound is to the south of the Albemarle Sound and north of the Pamlico Sound. The sound separates the main outer banks from Roanoke island.


Source: http://www.outerbanks.com/roanoke-sound.html



(Pictured below: tide-forecast.com)

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The Importance of Estuaries

Estuaries like the Roanoke Sound are very important to the environment because they offer a sanctuary like area for young animals/birthing. In addition, the estuaries support wide varieties of life not found anywhere else.

Life in the Sound

The sound (as with other estuaries) supports a huge variety of life. Many of the animals simply visit on migratory trips (many of these are extremely endangered) these include Orcas, the Grey Whale, the North Atlantic Right, Humpback Whales, Great White Sharks, and Basking Sharks.


The Estuary itself is home to an extensive population of smaller fish and shellfish like Sea Bass, shrimp, clams, red drum, stripped bass, king fish, blue crab, bluefish, and oysters.


Plant life in the sound includes many types of water loving grasses.


Source: NC Aquarium and Wikipedia


(pictured: travelerspoint.com)

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Feeding Bodies of Water

This sound is not directly connected to any rivers (some minor streams) so it receives most its water by exchange with other nearby sounds specifically the Crotan sound (which is in turn, fed by the Abarmarle Sound, which is fed by the Chowan and Roanoke rivers).


It should be known that the sound is relatively high in salinity.


Source: http://www.outerbanks.com/croatan-sound.html


(Pictured below: outerbanks.com)

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Threats to Estuaries

Our estuaries are at risk mainly due to pollution, human hunting/over fishing, and boats (propellers can kill animals). Recently there has been a push to safeguard NC estuaries but it may be too late and too little if the common person doesn't help. This is why we need everyone to be aware of the threats to our coastal ecosystems, and participate in conservation.


Source: estuaries.org