Tundras

By Jerry Li Period 6

5 Abiotic Factors

Freezing temperatures

Strong winds

Permafrost

Soil

Precipitation


http://alpinetundrabiome.weebly.com/biotic-and-abiotic-factors.html

5 Biotic factors

Norway lemmings

Migratory birds

Sandpipers

Arctic bumblebees

Reindeer mosses


http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/glossary/gloss5/biome/archive/tundra-old.html

Climate

Average yearly precipitation:

It doesn't precipitate often, and usually in the summertime. You can expect 5-15 inches (about 12.7 to 38.1 centimeters)


Temperatures:

In the winter, average temperatures are between -18 to -50. In the summer, 30 degrees to -50 degrees.

http://biology.tutorvista.com/ecology/tundra.html?view=simple

Plant Life

Most plants reproduce asexually, since the season for growing is short.

http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/exhibits/biomes/tundra.php

There is only 1 kind of tree, the dwarf tree -- which is 5 centimeters tall.

https://biomef.wikispaces.com/Tundra

Animal Life

The animals in the tundra are adapted for chilly winters, and are able to nurture and raise young quickly in summer. Some animals present are birds, lemmings, arctic bees, arctic wolves, and even arctic rabbits.


http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/glossary/gloss5/biome/tundra.html

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Why do Humans Need Tundras?

There are endangered animals here, such as Gyrfalcon and Collared Pikas.

http://animals.pawnation.com/endangered-species-alpine-tundra-8745.html

How do Humans Affect This Biome?

Global warming could melt the permafrost and change what species can live there.

Air pollution can build up smog clouds that take away lichen, a remarkable food source.

http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/habitats/tundra-threats/

How can Humans Help Protect this Biome?

One step to minimize global warming is to switch to an alternate energy source.

Another act is to limit road construction, mining, and the building of pipelines.

http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/habitats/tundra-threats/

What are Tundras Known For?

Tundras are known for their cold, dry conditions (that is, where there's no wet snow still not melted).

http://www.blueplanetbiomes.org/tundra_climate_page.htm

Interesting Facts about Biomes

The youngest biome on Earth is the Arctic Tundra, which which formed at the end of the last ice age, which was 10,000 years ago.

"Tundra" means "treeless plain."

http://www.hww.ca/en/where-they-live/canadas-arctic-tundra.html


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The Tundra Biome

Tundra means "treeless plain". Tundras are always covered in permafrost. The only kind of tree, the dwarf tree, is not very tall. Located in the Northern Hemisphere, tundras are the coldest biome in the world. Because of this, many Arctic animals are well adapted to the environmental chill. The snow melts slowly, and it doesn't snow very often. This is good because it keeps the tundra from going snow high.



http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/glossary/gloss5/biome/archive/tundra.html

https://biomef.wikispaces.com/Tundra