WWI Project

Kassidy Arp & Ryan Goodlet Block 4

Militarism

The belief or desire of a government or people that a country should maintain a strong military capability and be prepared to use it aggressively to defend or promote national interests. Militarism and the Europeans arms race we're contributing factors to the outbreak of WWI.

This picture shows-


  • Countries need to maintain a strong government and military capability
  • Countries need to aggressively defend and promote national interests.




Tanks

The tanks had to have a top speed on flat ground, be able to make sharp turns at top speed, have a reverse function, be able to climb hills, cross a 8 foot gap, and hold 10 crew members. The first tank was nicknamed 'Little Willie' and was first made when Colonel Ernest Swinton when he collaborated Ideas with Winston Churchill.

This picture shows-

  • Ernest Swinton collaborated ideas with Winston Churchill to make the tanks
  • The first tank was called Little Willie
  • Tanks have to perform at top speeds, perform sharp turns, and reverse functions.




Submarines

The most significant exception to the concept of coastal activity was the German Deutschland class of merchant U-boats, each 315 feet long with two large cargo compartments. These submarines could carry 700 tons of cargo at 12- to 13-knot speeds on the surface and at seven knots submerged. The Deutschland itself became the U-155 when fitted with torpedo tubes and deck guns, and, with seven similar submarines, it served in a combat role during the latter stages of the war. In comparison, the "standard" submarine of World War I measured slightly over 200 feet in length and displaced less than 1,000 tons on the surface. Submarines were created by Cornelis Drebbel in 1620.

This picture shows-


  • Cornelis Drebbel made the first submarine in 1620
  • Standard submarines are slightly over 200 feet in length and displaced less than 1000 tons on surface.




Big image

Treaty of Versailles

The Treaty of Versailles imposed penalties on Germany, which had been blamed by the Allies for starting World War 1. Austria-Hungary which was mobilized first and Germany declared war and invaded Belgium. This meant that they were popular among many Germans. One of the provisions of the Treaty of Versailles was that the Rhineland (the region of Germany bordering on France) should be demilitarized. When the Nazis came to power (1933), one of the first things they did was remilitarize the Rhineland.

This pictures show-


  • Germany was blamed by allies
  • Austria-Hungary was mobilized and Germany invaded Belgium
  • Rhineland was demilitarized until 1933


Alliances

Triple Entente was Great Britain, France and Russia and the Triple Alliance was Germany, Austria-Hungary, & Italy. Austria-Hungry declared war on Serbia (Russia's ally). Germany then declares war on Russia and launches the Schlieffen Plan. France is defeated first by the German army and Germany attacks France through Belgium making them neutral. As a result Great Britain declares war on Germany.

This picture shows-

  • Triple entente was Great Britain, France, & Russia
  • Triple alliance was Germany, Austria-Hungary, & Italy
  • Schlieffen Plan is launched
  • As result Great Britain declares war on Germany


Big image

Nationalism

Nationalism and extreme patriotism were significant contributing factors to the outbreak of World War I. Every one of Europe’s Great Powers developed a firm but excessive belief in its own cultural, economic and military supremacy. This over-confidence gave birth to a fatal misconception: that in the event of war in Europe, one’s own country would be victorious. Nationalism could also be found in other cultural expressions, like literature, music and theatre.

This picture shows-


  • Deep devotion to ones country
  • Unifying forces
  • Competition between nations
  • Land disputes



Big image

Imperialism

It was a provocative move which brought France and Germany to the brink of war. Germany’s interference in Morocco was not designed to expand its empire, but rather to drive a wedge between France and Britain. It in fact had the opposite effect, contributing to the strengthening of the Anglo-French alliance and inviting British criticisms about German weltpolitik and ‘gunboat diplomacy’.


This picture shows-


  • Nations competing for African colonies



Big image

Assassination

The first assassination attempt failed due to the quick reaction. Franz Ferdinand saw something flying towards him and raised his hand in a protective gesture, thus knocking the hand grenade out of the car. It landed on the car behind him, injuring two of that car's passengers. The perpetrator tried to commit suicide by swallowing a cyanide pill, but as the pill was old, the poison failed to work and only made him sick. He was stopped by people on the street and arrested. The archduke's procession sped quickly to City Hall. There, it was decided that they would take a different route to the grounds of the military parade. Not long after starting the driver of one of the cars leading the procession noticed that they were going the wrong way. The cars turns back, Meanwhile, a second conspirator had taken up position. He seized his opportunity, and fired his pistol twice into the car. Franz Ferdinand was shot in the neck; Sophie in the abdomen. Their attacker also swallowed a cyanide pill, which also failed to work. While the second attacker was held by passersby, Franz Ferdinand and his wife Sophie died in their car from their injuries.

This picture shows-


  • The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand (1863 – 1914) and his wife, Sophie (1868 – 1914) they had just arrived in Sarajevo after a visit with German Emperor William II. On the way into the city, their procession of cars had to drive relatively slowly, which played into the hands of the attackers that lay in wait.





Big image