Child Labor

By Autumn Remec

Is Child Labor Ever Necessary?

Introduction

In an article "Child Labor" this is how child labor is described, "For children five to eleven years old, child labor is defined as engagement in at least one hour of economic activity or twenty-eight hours of household chores per week. For children ages twelve to fourteen, child labor is defined as at least fourteen hours of economic activity or twenty-eight hours of household chores per week." Child labor most of the time is dangerous. Some children are forced to work with dangerous machinery for long hours with little to no pay. There have been laws passed to help prevent it, but it still happens. When children work for long hours every day they have no time for school, so therefore they can't get a good education to get a better job with better pay when they are older. This means that

Pros

  • Helps provide money for the family
  • Kids can learn from it
  • Sometimes they work in safe environments where they are treated fairly
  • This picture shows a ten year old boy teaching a four year old boy how to make brick, which he could use to get a better job in the future.
Big image
This shows two girls working at a textile mill in Rhode Island.

Cons

  • Most of the time is dangerous
  • Doesn't have enough time to go to school
  • Most work long hours
  • Sometimes sent away to work without their family
  • Lots of kids get treated unfairy
Big image
These graphs show the percentage of kids in each country that work. In Mali over half of the workers are kids!

Conclusion/Answer to E.Q.

Child labor is sometimes necessary, but it should always be done in a safe environment. Kids should also be treated fairly. It is necessary when the family needs money very badly, and that is the only way for the family to be able to survive. Children who work should be above the age that the law states, and should be treated fairly. If you don't need money so bad that if you don't get a dollar a day (they don't get paid much) you won't be able to survive, then child labor is not necessary. Only in desperate conditions should child labor take place. Most kids involved in child labor are treated very unfairly and it isn't how you want to live your whole childhood.
Big image
This picture shows kids working in a vegetable cannery in Baltimore, Maryland.

Bibliograhy

Anti-Slavery International and International Confederation of Free Trade Unions. "Forced Child Labor Is a Human Rights Abuse." Do Children Have Rights? Ed. Jamuna Carroll. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2006. At Issue. Rpt. from "Forced Labour in the 21st Century." 2001. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 8 Dec. 2015


"Arise Against Child Labour [column]." Africa News Service 2 July 2015. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 8 Dec. 2015


Big Numbers From Small Hands. N.d. Supply Chain Digest. Web. 27 Mar. 2008. <https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/36/e9/48/36e9480382681ac98327184d44561199.jpg>.


CHILD LABOR, 1912. - Children Working in a Vegetable Cannery in Baltimore, Maryland. Photographed in 1912 by Lewis W. Hine.. Fine Art. Encyclopædia Britannica ImageQuest. Web. 15 Dec 2015. http://quest.eb.com/search/140_1628787/1/140_1628787/cite


Child Labor. Photographer. Encyclopædia Britannica ImageQuest. Web. 14 Dec 2015. http://quest.eb.com/search/115_2756199/1/115_2756199/cite


Child Labor. Photography. Encyclopædia Britannica ImageQuest. Web. 14 Dec 2015. http://quest.eb.com/search/139_1911809/1/139_1911809/cite


"Child Labor." Opposing Viewpoints Online Collection. Detroit: Gale, 2014. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 8 Dec. 2015.


Tierney, John J. "Regulated Child Labor Is Necessary in Developing Countries." Child Labor and Sweatshops. Ed. Ann Manheimer. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2006. At Issue. Rpt. from "The World of Child Labor." The World & I Online. Vol. 15. 2000. 54. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 10 Dec. 2015.