Pocahontas

Growing up

Pocahontas was the daughter of a very important Virginia Indian leader and paramount chief. She was born in 1569 and was given the name Amonute, her father named her Pocahontas (Charlotte, 1995). The nickname for Pocahontas is, "playful one." As a young girl she would help her mom and others with anything. Since there was no schools, Pocahontas learned from those around her and her mother and father's actions. As she got older helped out with scraping and tanning deer skin and would canoe into the marsh to collect reeds to sit on. (Charlotte, 1995)

thesis

Pocahontas was the daughter of a very important chief, all she ever wanted was neutralism. She achieved a short lived period of peace between the English settlers and her tribe, Powhatan. However, she got captured by her tribe and the peace was over. Throughout everything, Pocahontas was courageous and always stood firm in her beliefs.

Marriage to John Rolfe and the rescue of John Smith

John Smith and two colonists were captured by Powhatan warriors while exploring the Chickahominy River in December 1607 (History.com staff, 2009). Pocahontas's marriage to John Rolfe stabilized peace between the Jamestown settlers and Powhatan Indians for many years. Right before Smith was supposed to be killed, Pocahontas got in the way of the incident. Smith became the president of the Jamestown colony in 1608, but the people continued to suffer (History.com staff, 2009). In 1609 Smith was injured in a fire and was forced to return to England, because of his departure Pocahontas and Smith's relations died out (History.com staff, 2009). John Rolfe's arrival in 1610 cultivated the source of tobacco, resulting in much hope for Virginia (History.com staff, 2009). Around 1613 Pocahontas was captured by English Samuel Argall in hopes to negotiate a permanent peace with her father (History.com staff, 2009). Pocahontas was brought to Jamestown and put under the custody of Sir Thomas Gates who was the marshall of Virginia. Pocahontas was treated by Gates as a guest rather than a prisoner and tried to encourage her to learn the English customs. Pocahontas was baptized by Lady Rebecca and converted to Christianity. In April 1614, Pocahontas and John Rolfe married with the blessing of Chief Powhatan and the governor of Virginia (History.com staff, 2009).

Birth of Thomas Rolfe and the death of Pocahontas

For many years there was peace among the colonists and the Powhatans. Around 1615, Pocahontas gave birth to a boy, Thomas Rolfe (History.com staff, 2009). In 1616 the couple sailed to England (History.com staff, 2009). In March 1617, Rolfe and Pocahontas were prepared to return to Virginia, but the day before they were about to leave Pocahontas died from smallpox (History.com staff, 2009). John Rolfe was killed in an Indian massacre when he returned to Virginia in 1622 (History.com staff, 2009).

work cited

1.Source: "Pocahontas." American History. ABC-CLIO, 2015. Web. 27 Oct. 2015


How it relates to the project: This article explains information about her childhood, marriage, accomplishments, and beliefs.


2. Source: "Wedding of Pocahontas." Photos/Illustrations. Library of Congress. American History. ABC-CLIO, 2015. Web. 27 Oct. 2015.


How it relates to the project: This article talks about Pocahontas’s marriage to John Rolfe in 1614, who developed a strain of tobacco which would provide the colony of Virginia a very popular cash crop.


3. Source: "Pocahontas Saves John Smith: 1607." Global Events: Milestone Events Throughout History. Ed. Jennifer Stock. Vol. 6: North America. Farmington Hills, MI: Gale, 2014. Student Resources in Context. Web. 27 Oct. 2015.


How it relates to the project: This article explains how Pocahontas saved John Smith from the Native Americans in 1607. She threw herself over him right before he was going to be executed and convinced her father to release him.



4. Source: "The Earliest Women: Native Americans." Women in America. Woodbridge, CT: Primary Source Media, 1999. American Journey. Student Resources in Context. Web. 27 Oct. 2015.


How it relates to the project: This article talks about Pocahontas’s desire for peace between tribes. Despite her courage for peace, she later gets captured by the tribe.



5. Source: "Jamestown Colony." Gale Encyclopedia of U.S. History: Government and Politics. Detroit: Gale, 2009.Student Resources in Context. Web. 28 Oct. 2015


How it relates to the project: This article explains the Jamestown colony and Pocahontas’s effects on the colony.