Forensics

By Maddi Coolican

What is a Foorensic Scientist?

"A forensic scientist help investigators to collect scientific evidence. Specialists in anthropology, psychology, information technology, medicine dentistry, Pathology, foot prints, tyre tracks and Premises Evidence and many other field also answer important forensic questions. But a forensic scientist is a scientific knowledge that is used by legal system. Forensic scientist collect and analyses evidence form a crime scene that will allow the police to find out what exactly happened there and who probably committed the crime. Forensic scientist can also give a legal team evidence that can be used to prosecute or defend people accused of a crime. Forensic scientist helps to answer questions such as when the death occurred and why, how fast a car was travelling on impact and what the blood alcohol concentration of the driver was at the time, or something similar as the type of white power found in a suitcase by a customs.” From the book of science dimensions written by G Rickard, ital. says that From the book of science dimensions written by G Rickard, ital. says that

Watch a short movie Its called Day in the life of a Forensic patholgy

Day in the Life - Forensic Pathology - A/Prof David Ranson

What does a forensic scientist do?

There are many thing a forensic scientist dose including: Anthropology, psychology, information technology, medicine dentistry, Pathology, foot prints, tyre tracks and Premises Evidence and many other field also answer important forensic questions.

Fun Facts!

  1. Forensic science uses a range of sciences to answer questions related to legal situations.

  2. Forensic science is often used in relation to criminal matters, a lawyer may want to prove someone was present at the location of a crime for example.

  3. Samples from a crime scene are analyzed in a laboratory by specialists.

  4. Samples can include things like fingerprints, hair and gunshot residue.

  5. While some forensic tests can be completed in as little as an hour, others may take months. There are a large range of specialist fields in forensics including forensic pathology, forensic toxicology, forensic anthropology, forensic chemistry, DNA analysis, forensic entomology, computational forensics and more.

  6. In the case of forensic entomology, scientists examine insects found in and around human remains to determine the time of death.

  7. Forensic toxicology studies the effect of drugs and poisons on the human body in relation to medical and legal situations.

  8. The famous fictional character Sherlock Holmes used forensic science as one of his methods for investigating crimes.

  9. Examples of forensic science can be found throughout popular culture, including television shows such as CSI, Bones, NCIS, Law & Order and the Mentalist, which all use forensic science as part of their story lines.

  10. CSI: Crime Scene Investigation has been particularly popular, leading to a number of spin off shows, books and video games. It has even created a so called 'CSI effect' where members of the public have exaggerated expectations of forensic science due to their use on television shows.

Here is a great Link to a website that has great games and quizs!

What is Forensic Science?

This is how you take a Forensic impression of a footprint

Here is another way to take a forensic foot impresstion

http://www.wikihow.com/Make-a-Plaster-Cast-of-a-Footwear-Mark,-Tyre-Impression-or-Animal-Footprint states that

  1. One pound weight Plaster of Paris in a strong plastic bag - the bag needs to be large enough to add sufficient water when ready to cast the impression.


  2. Water in a plastic bottle - at least one pint (approx 500mls) volume.


  3. Can of hairspray (optional) - if the footwear mark is in loose soil, powder, or a sandy particulate material, spraying the footwear mark with hairspray first will hold the particles of the soil or powder together so the casting material does not distort it.


  4. A small trowel or spade - to dig/prise the cast from the soil once it has hardened.


  5. A paint brush (to clean the area of the impression of small stones, loose soil, leaves or insects)


  6. An old toothbrush (to clean the soil from the cast once it is recovered)


  7. On locating your footwear, vehicle tyre, or animal footprint impression


  8. Paper 'exhibit' label on a piece of string (optional) - to affix to the cast to identify when and where it was recovered from.


  9. Digital camera (optional)- to take pictures of the impression before casting, and to record the area around the impression.


  10. Ruler (optional) - to place by the impression when photographed to indicate the size of the shoe.