Reach for the STAAR - 2015

Ensuring student Mastery of our desired learning outcomes!

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How might we ensure EVERY student masters our desired learning outcomes?

Objectives:

  • Define rigor and mastery
  • Examine role of rigor and mastery in assessments and instruction
  • Lead teachers through design process to develop solutions to EQ


Secondary Outcomes:

  • Write rigorous multiple-choice assessment items
  • Design performance tasks to demonstrate student mastery


AGENDA
:
  • Collective definition of RIGOR and MASTERY
  • Analyze and compare STAAR assessment items and local assessment items
  • Explore performance tasks
  • Design and develop solutions to our EQ
  • Share solutions with all participants

A little about me

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Defining RIGOR

Review Responses from Anticipatory Guide

Collective Definition of Rigor

Each group creates a definition for rigor and then we will create a whole group definition through consensus.

Defining Mastery

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TLDR version of "How Good is Good Enough?"

Students have mastered a subject when they are fluent, even creative, in transferring their knowledge, skills, and understanding in key performance challenges and contexts, as measured against valid and high standards.


A march through facts and subskills, dotted with numerous quizzes, is not a path to true mastery. Mastery is the effective and graceful transfer of learning to meet authentic performance challenges. The issue of getting students to mastery must be addressed locally by overhauling the quality of local grading and testing to calibrate them with wider-world standards. It is way past time that educators master the idea of genuine mastery.

TLDR: The 'Angry Birds' Guide to Online Lesson Design

http://tedcurran.net/2011/02/14/angry-birds-guide-to-online-lesson-design/
  • Angry Birds is a game where you aim a giant slingshot to catapult various colored birds towards a castle filled with green pigs. The object is to destroy the building and crush all the pigs.
  • Successful video games strike the perfect balance of motivation, skill building, and assessment.
  • Make sure you have clearly identified your educational objectives before you start designing learning activities! They help you stay focused on whether your learning activities are really building the skills that you want to assess.
  • Make sure you have clearly identified your educational objectives before you start designing learning activities! They help you stay focused on whether your learning activities are really building the skills that you intend to assess.
  • This emphasizes the importance of communicating the expected learning outcomes of each lesson explicitly to students. They should be able to walk out of your class meeting and say “today, I learned ‘x’, ‘y’, and ‘z’ in class”. This builds their metacognition and helps them recall previous learning that might be applied to new situations.
  • Lecturing is one of the most common activities that a teacher does, no matter how much evidence mounts that lecturing is an ineffective use of the teacher’s time and expertise; not correlated with mastery of material; and a task that can be just as effectively performed by a video recording
  • The game (unlike most classrooms) is a safe place to fail. There are no punishments for not having the right answer the first time or being the fastest. Instead, video games reward users who keep trying, experimenting with alternative strategies, and even cheating looking up the correct answer.

Collective Definition of Mastery

Each group creates a definition for mastery and then we will create a whole group definition through consensus.
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Performance Assessments

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Design & Thinking Official Trailer

What is design thinking?

Loosely put, design thinking is a set of tools, methods, and processes by which we develop new answers for challenges, big and small. Through applying design thinking to challenges, we learn to define problems, understand needs and constraints, brainstorm innovative solutions, and seek and incorporate feedback about our ideas in order to continually make them better. The more we apply design thinking to the challenges we see, the deeper we strengthen the belief in our ability to generate creative ideas and make positive change happen in the world.


Excerpted from Design Thinking in Schools

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TEDxLondon - Ewan McIntosh

Design Process

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Empathize

Empathy is the centerpiece of a human-centered design process. The Empathize mode is the work you do to understand people, within the context of your design challenge. It is your effort to understand the way they do things and why, their physical and emotional needs, how they think about world, and what is meaningful to them.


- Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford Design Thinking for Educators Toolkit

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Define

Generate a range of “How-Might-We . . .?” brainstorming topics that flow from your problem statement. These brainstorming topics typically are subsets of the entire problem, focusing on different aspects of the challenge.


- Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford Design Thinking for Educators Toolkit

IDEATE

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Try designating three voting criteria (we might suggest “the most likely to delight,” “the rational choice,” “the most unexpected” as potential criteria, but they’re really up to you) to use to vote on three different ideas that your team generated during brainstorming. Carry the two or three ideas that receive the most votes forward into prototyping. In this way, you preserve innovation potential by carrying multiple ideas forward—a radically different approach than settling on the single idea that at least the majority of the team can agree upon.


- Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford Design Thinking for Educators Toolkit

Prototype

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Build with the user in mind. What do you hope to test with the user? What sorts of behavior do you expect? Answering these questions will help focus your prototyping and help you receive meaningful feedback in the testing phase.


- Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford Design Thinking for Educators Toolkit

TEST

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The NEED for Design Thinking...

This movement to build a generation of design thinkers could not be more timely or more relevant. We are living in an age of increased complexity, and are facing global challenges at an unprecedented scale. The nature of connectivity, interactivity, and information is changing at lightening speed. We need to enable a generation of leaders who believe they can make a difference in the world around them, because we need this generation to build new systems and rebuild declining ones. We need them to be great collaborators, great communicators, and great innovators.


- Excerpted from Design Thinking in Schools

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Design Thinking Resources

http://dschool.stanford.edu/ d.school: Institute of Design at Stanford

The d.school fellowship program helps restless experts grow creative and resilient organizations, to accelerate systems-level impact in their areas of expertise.


http://notosh.com/ NoTosh learning | digital | design thinking

The Design Thinking School Project-based learning has been let down in too many instances with “fake,” academic, theoretical problems that need ...


http://gettingsmart.com/2013/11/design-thinking-schools-emerging-movement-building-creative-confidence-youth/ Design Thinking in Schools: An Emerging Movement Building

By Sandy Speicher. A few years ago I interviewed a group of high school students who had just taken a semester-long “Introduction to Design Thinking” course.


https://vialogues.com/vialogues/play/9725 Dialogues : Annette Diefenthaler, IDEO

Annette Diefenthaler, a Senior Design Research Specialist & Project Lead at IDEO, discusses creating and launching IDEO's Design Thinking for Educators Toolkit. #

Amber Rinehart

Technology Integration Specialist, Austin ISD