Hip-Hop into Learning:

Hip-Hop Based Education in the Elementary Classroom

Yes, I Am Here to Move the Crowd.... (Eric B and Rakim)

Allow Me to [re] Introduce Myself…… (Jay Z)


I am NyRee Clayton-Taylor and I. Love. Hip-Hop. Growing up in the 80’s and 90’s provided me the opportunity to be the first generation to grow up entirely on hip-hop. I remember how I was “schooled” by emcees who would spread their gospel using a body of beats to educate me on topics of Unity (Queen Latifah), Fighting the Power (Public Enemy), and taught me how to be Everything I Am (Kanye West). These teachers enlightened me with a perspective that was not discussed in my classroom. Hip-hop was my window into the mind, thoughts, and beliefs of others and my first introduction into an analytical body of knowledge that was tangible to me. Hip-hop was there; before books, teachers, and homework, hip-hop was there. It was my beginning into critical literacy and, for many of my students, it’s their beginning as well.


As urban students of color enter into elementary classrooms, students oftentimes find themselves thrown into the midst of an educational achievement gap. In fact, since the establishment of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), urban students of color, have scored significantly behind their Caucasian counterparts, and while there have been some gains, urban students of color are still suffering from educational disparities that stem from student tracking, negative stereotyping, and test bias. It is because of these factors that some scholars believe that urban school districts should explore effective approaches that teach from the perspectives of the learner. This is the basis for Hip Hop Based Education (HHBE) (Edmin, 2013). For many, hip-hop is their universal language and has been a transformative medium for many disenfranchised urban youth (Hill & Petchauer, 2013) (Edmin, 2013) as well as a tool of empowerment that speaks to the injustices of their community.


Urban education scholar, Christopher Emdin (2013), believes that a hip-hop based curriculum is more than a focus of popular rap songs and how they rhyme but a Deweyan tradition of “culture-focused pedagogy”. He states the non-use of culturally responsive teaching is one the many reasons urban youth view school as boring, unimaginative, and unrelated to their everyday experiences. He further suggests that even when educators are rooted in the “culture-focused pedagogy” their approaches are ineffective because teachers do not understand how deeply immersed urban students of color are into the hip-hop culture (p.11). This is why HHBE is needed. It is needed to unlock the doors that stand between the urban learner’s perspective and the disconnect between contemporary schooling.



It's Bigger Than Hip-Hop....... (Dead Prez)


So how do we do this? How do we effectively connect the “known to the new” and use HHBE in the elementary classroom? I’ve read articles from scholars like Christopher Emdin, Marc Lamont Hill, and Jeff Chang who have articulately explained how some middle and high school teachers have used aspects of HHBE as an educational framework. However, articles are lacking when it comes to fully implementing HHBE in the elementary classroom. I understood the research behind HHBE, and that using hip-hop in the classroom would be entertaining and culturally responsive, but how could I make it age-appropriate and rigorous? How would I be able to effectively teach students how to read and master state standards using HHBE? And, most importantly, how would I use HHBE to engage those students in my classroom who were struggling and reluctant to write?


My journey into these questions started 8 years ago at Fairdale Elementary School.

I developed a hip-hop alphabet chart in hopes of developing a reading lesson that was culturally responsive. While I felt this was a great idea, it didn’t translate well. I couldn’t find a way to make it fit in my classroom because of the age-appropriateness of the visuals. But this wasn’t my only problem.


After leaving Fairdale Elementary School and entering Phillis Wheatley, I was sure using hip-hop was going to save my students and trigger them into wanting to read and write more but it wasn’t the case. While they were excited about getting the lyrics and trying to read them (and a few even tried to write their own rhymes that were awful) my implementation of hip-hop was just smoke and mirrors. A ploy to just try to engage my students. I wasn’t using hip-hop as the critical learning tool needed to “teach and reach” my students .


I began to think about the standards that most of my students had a hard time grasping, and I remembered standard RL.3.6. This standard states that 3rd grade readers must be able to distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters. I knew this standard was hard for my students to grasp because students often think of characters as simplistic and one-dimensional. It was also hard for my students to see how characters could have multifaceted personalities and deal with complex issues. I didn’t want to just focus on the character’s feelings but I wanted to focus on the multiple perspectives of the characters, and how they are influenced by the world in which they live (Cherry-Paul & Johasen, 2014) (Lehman & Roberts, 2014).


Critical Literacy Theorist, Bianca Nightengale-Lee, used multiple-perspectives to develop letters from the point of view of the characters. I was able to take her idea and implement the use HHBE so students could create hip-hop songs from the perspective of the characters. This, I knew, would be engaging, but I also knew it was going to be a challenge. I had students in my classroom who did not like to write and who could not read on grade level. I did not want to stereotype my students by not pushing them, but I knew I had to create a safe environment where they were able to take risks, push boundaries, and become transformed.


I Know I Can.... (Nas)


In order to do this, first we had to identify multiple perspectives and understand that perspective is the point of view of the character. As a group, we identified what the main character said, his actions, and his thoughts (S.A.T) from the book, More than Anything Else by Marie Bradby. We used the close reading strategy, a careful, sustained interpretation of a brief passage of text and identified what the character said, the character’s actions, and the character’s thoughts. Using this close reading strategy allowed students to develop new ideas and think more powerfully about the text. It also enabled them to reflect on what the evidence revealed about the character in the beginning, middle, and ending of the story. After two weeks of charting the main character’s S.A.T., we were able to develop a hip-hop song from the perspective of the main character. Students were able to create bars (sentences in a rap song)

using a graphic organizer that helped them develop lyrics and rhyming words to match.


As time progressed, I began to use all of the elements of Hip-Hop including:

· Knowledge (Street/Self-Awareness)

· Graffiti (Street Art)

· B-Boyin (Dancing/Break Dancing)

· DeJayin’ (Technology)

· Fashion (Self-Expression)

· Language (African American Vernacular English)

· Emceein’ (Rap)

· Beat Boxin’ (Beats)

· Entrepreneurship (Ownership)


It is my hope that by merging the ideas of HHBE, critical literacy, and the state standards that I have made it useful for the elementary classroom and for my students. I hope that my students, who are urban students of color, will be transformed at school and in their communities. Not only do I want them to gain a deeper understanding of the ELA and Writing Standards but I also want them to successfully "connect the known to the new". This is true transformation and the true goal of hip-hop based education.

First Things, First... (Notorious B.I.G)

Creating a Classroom that Speaks "Hip-Hop"

When creating a classroom that speaks "Hip-Hop", it is imperative that students are in an environment that fosters creativity, ownership, and familiarity. It should be a place for students to be their authentic selves. The classroom must be relevant and offer inspiration through the classroom experience. When I began to create my classroom, I wanted a place that was non-traditional and offered the 9 elements of Hip-Hop in a classroom setting.

You Must Learn.....(KRS-1)

Anchor charts are used in my classroom and explain the 9 Elements of Hip-Hop. Students learn the 9 elements and connect each element to writing.

The 9 Elements of Hip-Hop: Knowledge of Self

Big image

I Love Myself....(Kendrick Lamar)

Big image

I AM Graffiti Posters

Last summer, West Louisville was struck by the horrific murders of two young brothers. These two young brothers were killed by their "mentor" and were once students in Jefferson County. As this situation played out in the media, I realized that many of my students could one day be victims of violence. While I am not a social worker, I do know that encouraging students to have self-love is the first tool in helping children fight against self-hate, low self-esteem and violence against themselves and others. I wanted my students to feel empowered and self assured and this is when I began to create a curriculum that was tailor made to fit their needs. I knew Knowledge of Self had to be the first element of Hip-Hop we discussed in my classroom and had to be the interlocking theme of each element along with the element of Entrepreneurship.


Students created "I AM" graffiti posters to tap into their wants and dreams. Along with this assignment, students analyzed the song, Be Great by Kevin Ross and added similes and metaphors to define themselves.

KevinRossMusic

Be Great (Intro) feat Chaz French by KevinRossMusic

Knowledge of Self Lesson


Materials:

The 9 Elements of Hip-Hop Anchor Chart

9 Elements of Hip-Hop and Writing Flip Book

The 9 Elements of Hip-Hop and Writing Anchor Chart/SMART Notebook File (1/2)

The 9 Elements of Hip-Hop SMART Notebook File: The 9 Elements of Hip-Hop(1/2)

Writer’s Notebook Copy of Be Great by Kevin Ross Chart More Than Anything Else

Introduce the 9 Elements of Hip-Hop anchor chart.


1. Direct students to the Hip-Hop Anchor Chart.

2. Ask students if they understand the word, elements.

3. Ask for definitions; if there are not any suggestions, ask these questions:

(Pointing to the 9 elements)

“What do you think these are listed under the title?”

“What do you think they do?

4. Direct students to the word layers and show them what layers are by stacking hands on top of one another.

5. Read each element and ask what students know about each element. (Limit 1-3 min. on each element)

6. The 9 Elements of Hip-Hop and Writing Anchor Chart/SMART Notebook File and Flip Book (1/2).

7. Begin with the first element of Hip-Hop starting with, Knowledge of Self.


Knowledge of Self-Lesson

8. Essential Question: What makes me, me?

9. Show SMART Notebook File, Knowledge of Self- What Makes Me, Me? Web

10. Ask students, “What is Knowledge of Self/Self Knowledge?

11. List ideas on the white board. Possible ideas:

a. Ancestors

b. Parents

c. Likes/Dislikes

d. Environment

e. Beliefs

f. Culture


12. Teacher will add these ideas to his/her web being more specific. For example:

a. Name of parents

b. What you believe in

c. Where you live

d. Who raised you- single parent/without mom or dad


13. Send students back to their seats to complete their own webs using teacher example. (20 minutes)

14. Students come back to share findings.

15. Ask the question, “So how does this element of Hip-Hop, Knowledge of Self, connect to writing? Show the song, Be Great by Kevin. Read the lyrics and ask, “How do these lyrics connect with writing and Knowledge of self.


Be Great

Cause I’m gonna be great
I’m gonna be (great)
I’m gonna be (great)
I’m gonna be great, oooh
Gonna be great, gonna be great
I’m gonna be great

Yo, yo, yo
Gotta be better than good at it
Swear the goal is to be bigger than everyone before us
Gotta show my son and daughter, that just because they your idols
They don’t mean they won’t be rivals, I’m looking at it like I was them
And I’m just tryna show him it’s all in the passion
I got dreams bigger than life, only I can imagine.

Jackson, Jordan, Greatness

You, Me, Greatness


16. Pass out the lyrics and put students in groups to discuss how the lyrics show Knowledge of Self and how knowing your self can connect with writing.

Questions to ask:


How do you see self-knowledge in this text? What did Kevin Ross write about? Why did he write about this topic? Why is he writing about his son and daughter? What do dreams have to do with knowledge of self? How does this song connect with you and More Than Anything Else? What does Kevin mean when he says, “I’m looking at it like I was them” How can you use writing by “looking at it at it like I was them”? How does knowing about the life of Booker T. Washington add to your knowledge of self?

17. Call students back to carpet and list all ideas on graphic organizer, 9 Elements of Hip-Hop and Writing Anchor Chart.

18. Students write ideas on their own graphic organizer while teacher writes on anchor chart.


Graffiti Board

Students create designs on poster board and color using cool colors.

Take pictures of students for them to cut out and add to poster.

Students write about themselves using ideas from their web.

Element of Hip-Hop: Graffiti

Big image

Graffiti in the Classroom

In many urban neighborhoods, graffiti is a common staple on abandoned homes, sidewalks, and buildings. Since 1967, graffiti has been used to convey messages of warnings, love, and resistance. It is an art form that many urban students have every day access to and can use to their advantage in the classroom and this is what I do. I use graffiti as an informative piece of writing and art.


In the photo above, students read the Gettysburg Address. After reading the text, we highlighted repeated words and phrases to analyze the meaning of the text. After analyzing and reading the book, Abe's Honest Words by Doreen Rappaport, students made personal graffiti boards and a class graffiti board to show the information that was learned.

Abe's Famous Words by Doreen Rappaport

Big image

Graffiti Images Used in My Classroom

The images below are used in my classroom to introduce graffiti and to connect graffiti to writing, book illustrations, and displaying information. The lesson plan for these images are located under the images!
Big image
Big image
Big image
Big image

Introducing Graffiti Lesson Plan



Materials:

The 9 Elements of Hip-Hop Anchor Chart 9 Elements of Hip-Hop and Writing Flip Book The 9 Elements of Hip-Hop SMART Notebook File: The 9 Elements of Hip-Hop(1/2)

Writer’s Notebook Copy of Be Great by Kevin Ross More Than Anything Else Lyric/ Sentence graphic organizer

1. Introduce the 9 Elements of Hip-Hop anchor chart.

2. Revisit the first element, Knowledge of Self and talk about findings from the previous day.

3. Pass out graphic organizer from yesterday and The 9 Elements of Hip-Hop and Writing Anchor Chart/SMART Notebook File (1/2).

4. Begin with the second element of Hip-Hop, Graffiti.

Graffiti Lesson

5. Essential Question: How does Graffiti connect to writing?

6. Show SMART Notebook File, Graffiti

7. Ask students, “What is Graffiti?” while showing the images below.

8. Focus on the first image. Read the first image then ask the following questions:

9.

1 Have you ever seen images like this in your neighborhood?

a. Who is the audience for this message?

b. What does the “Goon Squad” want you to know?

c. What type of message is the “Goon Squad” sending?

d. What message is the graffiti artist trying to tell you?

a. How does this relate to writing?

b. Could this be a warning?

c. Are all messages something we want to hear?

d. Is the message clear? Why is this a clear message?

e. Is there a connection between this graffiti image and the illustration of More Than Anything Else?

f. How do illustrations tell stories? (Show the illustration from More Than Anything Else)

g. How does graffiti tell stories?

11. The teacher does NOT point out whether the message seems “bad” or “good”. Let the students state their own ideas and come up with their own answers during this time of instruction (Entrepreneurship/Ownership). The objective of this lesson is for students to form their own connections with the teacher being the guide.

12. Look at the second and third image asking similar questions.

13. Second Image: “I don’t want your coins, I WANT CHANGE”

14. Ask about the meaning of the word, change.

a. Does the word change have other meanings?

b. What are those meanings?

c. How is the word change used in this sentence?

d. What is the graffiti artist trying to tell you?

e. Is this a clear message?

f. How was art used?

g. Was there art used in the first image? Why are why not? (Look at the way the letters are formed)

15. Third Image: “Bee You” First ask what they notice about the image.

a. How was graffiti used in this image?

b. What message is the graffiti artist trying to tell you?

c. Do messages/sentences have to be long to get a point across?

h. Why?

i. How do these pictures tell stories?

j. How do illustrations tell stories? (Show an illustration from More Than Anything Else)

16. So what is the purpose of Graffiti? (To deliver strong messages

17. Point out these sentences from Be Great and More Than Anything Else:

· Jackson, Jordan, Greatness You, Me, Greatness

· They don’t know see what I see. They don’t see what I can be.

18. Using the chart below, ask students how these sentences connect with Graffiti?

19. Give out the chart and put students in groups to answer the chart.

20. Walk around and monitor students and ask clarifying questions if students are having problems

Text

Sentence/Lyric

How does this sentence connect with what we have just learned about graffiti?


Be Great

Jackson, Jordan, Greatness You, Me, Greatness

Strong message (Central Message). Words are just as visual as the graffiti drawings


More Than Anything Else

They don’t see what I see. They don’t see what I can be.


21. Clarifying questions:

a. How are these sentences like the messages used in the graffiti images?

b. What makes these sentences powerful?

c. What makes graffiti powerful?

d. How did the author use his/her knowledge of self to portray both messages?

22. Call students back to carpet and talk about their findings. Add them to the Writing and Hip-Hop Anchor Chart while students fill out their flip book.

Journal Writing/Prompt/ Closing Conversation

Prompt: Use Graffiti to explain who you are or Booker T. Washington. Try to use some of the sentences from Be Great and More Than Anything Else in your graffiti drawing.

23. Ask students who may want to share.

24. Reread More Than Anything Else.

Closing/Ms. Brown Art-Teacher

Making of Graffiti Board/Be Great Chart:

Materials:

Poster

Markers

Magazines

Scrap Paper

Graffiti Letter Examples

Cursive Letter Examples

1. Students make lines on the graffiti board and color them using soft colored markers.

2. Using scrap paper, students write and draw pictures of expectations to glue on the board.

3. Students may use magazine letters, graffiti letters or cursive writing to display the information on the book.

4. Closing-Conversation and Journal Prompt

5. Students read the expectations and discuss the meaning of them.

6. Journal Prompt: What did you learn about expectations and how will you use these expectations to help you in this class?

More Graffiti Boards

Element of Hip-Hop: B-Boying/Dancing

Big image

Using B-Boying/Dance to Teach Cursive Writing

I enjoy teaching cursive writing and I use popular Hip-Hop dance songs to teach students the technique in curving and stretching out lines to create letters. In the videos below, Kindergarten students practice making cursive "A" using the song, "Watch Me Whip, Watch Me Nae-Nae."

The Breaks.... (Kurtis Blow)

Breakdancing (B-Boyin') is one of four main elements of Hip-Hop along with graffiti, rapping (emceein') and DJing. B-Boys/B-Girls would use athletic moves during the breaks of songs while the D.J looped the drum beat and rhythm of the song together. The dancers would combine strength, momentum, balance and creativity to their dance moves; allowing the dance moves to tell the story of the music and the D.J.


Now understand, I do not teach my students to break dance (that would be a complete catastrophe) ! I do, however, introduce breakdancing using a video to discuss how breakdancing can tell a story just like writing.

I also use videos of the Alex Ailey Dance Company and popular dance Hip-Hop songs like, Juju on that Beat, Rollie, Rollie, Rollie, and Watch Me Whip and Nae.

AMAZING KIDS BATTLE! "GoPro" Bboy Drew vs Goldi Rox!
'Revelations' by Alvin Ailey
Ayo & Teo - Rollie with a dab of ranch
Juju on that beat

Introducing B-Boyin' Lesson Plan

Materials:

The 9 Elements of Hip-Hop Anchor Chart 9 Elements of Hip-Hop and Writing Flip Book The 9 Elements of Hip-Hop and Writing Anchor Chart/SMART Notebook File (1/2) The 9 Elements of Hip-Hop SMART Notebook File: The 9 Elements of Hip-Hop(1/2) Writer’s Notebook More Than Anything Else Video: Ju Ju On Dat Beat, Breakdancing, Alvin Ailey Dancers (In SMART Notebook)

1. Introduce the 9 Elements of Hip-Hop anchor chart.


2. Revisit the elements already learned and talk about students observations from the previous day.

3. Open the 9 Elements of Hip-Hop and Writing Anchor Chart/SMART Notebook File, B-Boyin’.

4. Ask students what they think the “B” in B-Boyin means.

5. Tell the meaning of the “B” in B-Boyin’. The B in B-Boyin means, break. It is commonly known as break dancing. It is called break dancing because the best dancers would dance during the “break” of the song. The break of the song is only when the music playing.

6. Before playing the breakdancing video, ask students, how do they think dancing and writing connect together? Explain to students that this is their job as they watch all three videos.

7. Play the breakdancing video, stopping periodically to allow students to answer the question and talk to their neighbor next to them. Write the answers on the chart.

8. Play the second video (Ju-Ju On Dat Beat). Making sure to stop periodically to allow students to answer the question and talk to their neighbor (Write answers on the chart).

9. Continue with the third video following the same steps as 8 and 9.

Possible Questions (during or after the video)

a. How are the movements of the dancers telling a story?

b. Is there a message being told in the dance moves?

c. What are the dance moves telling you?

d. When dancers are dancing with their partners or groups, are they trusting one another? Why is trust important when you dance?

e. How is trust important when you’re writing?

f. How is trust important to a writer and an illustrator? Is their relationship somewhat like a dance? Explain why.

g. What bold statements did you see in some of the dance moves? Did you see moves that said, “Yeah-I’m all that and you can’t touch me”? If so, what dance moves said this to you?

h. What words, questions, or answers did you see in some of the dancer’s movements? Can you demonstrate some?

i. Can you tell how dance connects to poetry, narrative, persuasive, and informational writing?

j. How does dancing and writing impact your imagination?

Hip-Hop Element: B-Boyin (Dancing)

How does this element connect to writing


Breakdancing


Ju Ju On Dat Beat


Alvin Ailey Dancers


Possible Suggestions

Hip-Hop Element: B-Boyin (Dancing)

How does this element connect to writing


Breakdancing

Creative, can challenge others, show expression, trust in your ability to dance and write. Shows imagination. Breakdancing is as truthful as writing because they both show your emotions.


Ju Ju On Dat Beat

Tells a story like you can with words. Every movement has a meaning like words/writing have a meaning. Tells a story about someone going out and everyone looking at him because he looks good, even with his nappy hair. (narrative) The dance moves tell this story. Persuades others to want to dance like persuasive writing can persuade the reader.


Alvin Ailey Dancers

Dancing was used as poetry, told information from the past. Use of imagination. Through their dances, I saw voice.


Journal Writing/Prompt/ Closing Conversation

10. Show the cover of the book, More Than Anything Else. Ask students how they could use dance moves to show the meaning of the words, More Than Anything Else a. Ask students if they see any movements on the cover of the book. b. Ask students to look at the way the author’s and the illustrator’s names are written. Do their names look like movements? Why do you think this is?

11. Put students in groups of 2 or 3 along with a copy of the book, More Than Anything Else. Using the page where Booker says, “They don’t see what I see. They don’t see what I can be. “Students use this page to illustrate through dancing. Students use current or old-school dance moves to tell the story using the words and illustrations of the text.

12. After 20 minutes, pick volunteers to share their performances.

13. Discuss how dancing may have impacted their imagination and how it relates to writing.

Element of Hip-Hop: Djing and Beat Boxong

daddy vs Daughter beatbox battle round 2
Grandmaster Flash Talks "The Theory" Of Being A HipHop DJ & The Beginnings Of Hip-Hop!!
Big image

Djing and Beat Boxing

When I introduce Djing and Beat Boxing, I introduce these two elements together. While I can't Dj or beat box, we watch a DJing and Beat Box challenge video and read the book, "When the Beat was Born." After reading the book we connect beat boxing and djing to writing.


After watching the DJing video, I make sure to focus on the technology Grandmaster Flash uses when he D.J's. This is the perfect opportunity to stress the importance of computer coding, music engineering, and other forms of computer based opportunities. In the following Adobe Spark video below, some students were able to use the idea of "DJing" when creating their Adobe Spark and also added instrumental Hip-Hop beats to their videos. Students also were able to talk to thirteen year old, DJ Richie about Djing.

DJ Richie

Big image

Introducing Beat Boxing and Djing Lesson Plan

I Can Statements:

I can identify the 9 Elements of Hip-Hop.

I can analyze the connections between the 9 Elements of Hip-Hop and Writing.

I can analyze the connection between More Than Anything Else, Beat Boxing and Djing.

Materials:

1. 9 Elements of Hip-Hop and Writing Flip Book

The 9 Elements of Hip-Hop and Writing Anchor Chart/SMART Notebook File (1/2)

The 9 Elements of Hip-Hop SMART Notebook File: Beat Boxing and Djing

Writer’s Notebook More Than Anything Else Beat Boxing/Djing/Writing Chart Beat Boxing Video Djing Video

Beat Boxing/ Djing Chart

Read Aloud: Hip-Hop Icon- Jay-Z

2. Introduce the 9 Elements of Hip-Hop anchor chart.


3. Revisit the elements already learned and talk about observations from the previous day.

4. Open the 9 Elements of Hip-Hop and Writing Anchor Chart/SMART Notebook File-Beat Boxing and Djing.

5. Students will compare the like and differences between Beat Boxing/Djing, Writing, and More Than Anything Else

6. Ask students what they know about Beat Boxing and Djing.

7. Show images of SMART Notebook/Video of Beat Boxing and Djing.

8. Begin with video of the father and daughter Beat Box challenge.

9. Students watch video and think about what they notice about Beat Boxing.

10. Stop video periodically, and ask the following questions:

a. What do you notice about what the father?

b. How is his body moving?

c. Why is his body moving this way?

d. Is his voice changing?

e. How does it change?

f. What do you notice about the daughter?

g. How does her body move?

h. Does her beat change? If so, how?

i. Does she add words to her beat?

j. How did this make you feel? Explain why.

k. Who do you believe did the best?

l. Was he/she distinguished?

m. What made him/her distinguished?

11. Add to answers to the Beat Boxing portion of chart.

12. Play video of Grandmaster Flash Djing. Stop video periodically to ask the following questions:

a. What is he doing?

b. What is Grandmaster Flash using?

c. How is he making beats?

d. Why are hands moving back and forth?

e. Does the beat change?

f. Is there more than one song playing at a time?

g. What does the beat make you want to do?

h. Why do you think he’s using technology?

13. Add answers to the Djing potion of chart.

After watching both videos, compare how Beat Boxing and Djing are alike and different on SMART Board.

14. Students add information to their chart and begin to connect Beat Boxing and Djing to More Than Anything Else and Writing.

15. Direct students to the repeated phrases used in More Than Anything Else. Explain to students how repeated phrases add a rhythmic flow to writing.

Beat Boxing

Djing

Connections to More Than Anything Else

Connections to Writing



Father moved to his own beat.

Added different beats

Added different sound effects

Daughter added different sound effects

Added words that sounded like a recording

Beats sounded like real recordings

Beats came from their mouths.

Beats changed the rhythm of song.

She’s practiced before

May have learned skill from her dad

Repeated Beats

Beats were the thoughts of the Beat Boxer

He’s making beats with a computer and two turn-tables

He’s using records

He’s merging two beats to make one song

The beat makes you want to get up and dance

It excites the listener

He’s practiced a lot, there seems to be a method he’s following

Repeated Beat

Merges ideas together: informational writing as a story

Repeated phrases were used in the text to set tone of book like beats set a tone for rapping and/or dancing

Story has a beat/poetic rhythm

Merge ideas together

Use of different modes of writing-PowerPoints, comic books,

Use of repeated words

Poetry has rhythm; along with other genres of writing-


Likes

Differences


Makes a beat

Makes you want to dance

Merges beats together

Shows creativity

A LOT of practice is involved

Have to know what beats go together but it still allows the D.J or Beatboxer to be free

Hands are used to keep the beat

Djing Beat Boxing

uses technology uses mouth

real records no technology


After watching both videos, compare how Beat Boxing and Djing are alike and different on SMART Board.

16. Students use likes and differences to fill in the rest of the first chart.

Journal Writing/Prompt/ Closing Conversation

17. Students go back to their area and add connections to Beat Boxing, Djing and writing to flip book.

Putting Raps to a beat

18. Teacher plays I Know I Can beat by Nas.

19. Teacher and students count out beats/rhythm.

20. Teacher puts students in groups of 2, giving them an iPad with I Know I Can instrumental.

21. Students add own rhyme to beat by adjusting rhyme so it fits with beat. (Students may use Beatboxing if willing)

22. Students practice their rhyme over the I Know I Can instrumental.

23. Students share songs.

24. Reflect and share learning for the day.

Element of Hip-Hop: Fashion

Big image

Element of Hip-Hop: Fashion

Fashion is always an element I like to talk about in my classroom. Students always have insightful conversations about clothing and how Hip-Hop can inspire you to be different or the same. In order to focus on individualism, I introduce students to the rapper Jidenna. Jidenna's fashions are inspired by the Harlem Renaissance.

Students are able to see how fashion and writing connect. They also make other observations about how fashion can sometimes cause people to feel better about themselves or less than. In this lesson, we discuss Kanye West's song "All Falls Down and listen to the edited version and talk about the meaning of the song.


Man I promise, I'm so self conscious
That's why you always see me with at least one of my watches
Rollies and Pasha's done drove me crazy
I can't even pronounce nothing, pass that Versace

Then I spent 400 bucks on this
Just to be like man, you ain't up on this
And I can't even go to the grocery store
Without some ones that's clean and a shirt with a team

It seems we living the American dream
The people highest up got the lowest self esteem
The prettiest people do the ugliest things
For the road to riches and diamond rings

All Falls Down (Edited)

Introducing Fashion Lesson

I Can Statements:

I can identify the 9 Elements of Hip-Hop. I can analyze the connections between the 9 Elements of Hip-Hop and Writing. I can analyze the connection between More Than Anything Else and Fashion. Materials:

9 Elements of Hip-Hop and Writing Flip Book

The 9 Elements of Hip-Hop and Writing Anchor Chart/SMART Notebook File (1/2)

The 9 Elements of Hip-Hop SMART Notebook File: Fashion

More Than Anything Else Kanye West All Falls Down

1. Revisit the elements already learned and talk about observations from the previous day.

2. Open the 9 Elements of Hip-Hop and Writing Anchor Chart/SMART Notebook File, Fashion.

3. Ask students the meaning of Fashion.

4. As students give suggestions, guide them to the understanding that what we wear can be another form of self-expression just like writing, ask the following questions:

a. Is fashion important to you?

b. Why is it important to you?

c. Does fashion show who you are? Give some examples of how fashion can show who you are.

d. Can fashion express how your feeling? Give some examples of how what you wear can express who you are.

5. Tell students that Hip-Hop Fashion is a distinctive style of dress originated by African Americans and Latinos who lived in the inner cities of New York where Hip-Hop was born.

6. Explain to students that their focus for today will be to analyze some “Old School” Hip-Hop fashions and some “New School” Hip-Hop fashions.

7. Display the following images on SMART Notebook File

8. Focus on image A, ask students the following questions:

a. Have ever seen or heard of Run DMC? This group in image A is Run DMC.

b. What types of fashion do you see on this group?

c. If Run DMC never said a word to you and walked in this room right now, what would you know about them?

9. Continue to ask the same questions for the rest of the images. Focusing on:

a. (B) Salt –n- Pepa – Kinte’ Cloth hat; proud of their heritage

b. (C) Micheal Jordan- What does he signify? Think about the line in Be Great- Jackson, Jordan, Greatness

c. Jidenna- Sings the song, Classic Man. Explain to students that as a child he couldn’t afford Jordan’s and latest fashions so he found his own style (Knowledge of Self-Entrepreneurship).

d. (E) Young Booker T. Washington- What does his clothing say about his environment?

A. B. C. D. E.

Image

Fashion- What You See (Outside)

Fashion- What this may say about the person/group (Inner)

A. Run DMC (Old School)

Jogging suit jacket, black leather jacket, big gold chain, black hat, glasses, hoodie

like sports, believes he’s cool, plays or likes sports, has a lot money because of the gold jewelry

Proud of who they are

B. Salt -n- Pepa (Old School)

Hats with kente’ cloth, oversized leather jackets, gold chain

Proud of their roots-Kente Cloth represents Africa

Self-confidence in who they are

Gold chain represents “flyness” and or cuteness

C. Jordan’s

Tennis shoes, black, gold, white

May think Michael Jordan is the greatest basketball player of all time. Symbol of coolness. May want to play ball like Michael Jordan. Wants to be seen as cool.

D. Jidenna (New School)

Blue suit, white pinstripe on the suit. Looks old-fashioned. White shirt, pocket watch hanging from vest.

Doesn’t follow traditional rules by dressing like other Hip-Hop artist. He’s a rule breaker. He may think highly of himself.

E. Booker T. Washington

Large shirt, hat, suspenders

His clothes are too big. Maybe hand-me-downs from his brother.

He has no choice in what he wears.

10. Ask students the following questions:

a. If fashion can be a symbol of clout, coolness, or money? Give some examples of how this is true.

e. Does fashion always show who you are?

f. What if you can’t afford the latest fashions?

g. What does this say about you?

h. What does this say about Booker?

11. Take a few more suggestions.

12. Point out that Fashion, like writing is another way of self-expression. It’s a way to talk “loudly” without making a single word.

13. Write how fashion and writing connect on the SMART Notebook as students write connections in their flip book.

Journal Writing/Prompt/ Closing Conversation

14. Pass out All Falls Down by Kanye West. Students listen to part of All Falls Down and read lyrics.

All Falls Down Kanye West

Man I promise, I'm so self-conscious
That's why you always see me with at least one of my watches

Then I spent 400 bucks on this Just to be like n*&^% you ain't up on this
And I can't even go to the grocery store
Without some ones that's clean and a shirt with a team

It seems we living the American dream
The people highest up got the lowest self-esteem

Put students in groups to analyze text.

15. Monitor students, asking questions to check for understanding.

16. After 15 minutes, call students back to the carpet and ask the following questions:

a. What is Kanye West saying in this song?

b. Why is he self-conscious?

c. How do you know?

d. What does he do to show that he’s self-conscious?

e. What does it mean when Kanye says, “You ain’t up on this?”

f. Who is he talking to?

g. Is he fronting/putting on a front? If so, why. If not, why.

h. Why does he have to go the grocery store with clean “ones” and a shirt with a team?

i. What does he mean when he says, “The people highest up, got the lowest self-esteem”

j. Do you think people sometimes where certain items to make themselves feel better?

Students use writing prompt is to write about a time they may have felt self-conscious about their clothes. Students may also write about a time their clothes said exactly how they were feeling.

Write a letter to Booker. Explaining to him why his clothes can’t dictate his future.

After 20 minutes, pick volunteers to share their letters

Element of Hip-Hop: Language African American Vernacular English (AAVE)

As a writing teacher, I can admit, I do not like the term, code switching. While I do understand the term, I am a firm believer in allowing students to write without feeling like their language is wrong. Don't get me wrong, I strongly believe in teaching grammar and preparing students for their future. I just believe in empowering students to make this decision for themselves. I let them make the decision when to use their AAVE and not.

To introduce this topic of AAVE, we watch the poem spoken by Jamila Lyiscott and analyze what she is saying.

3 ways to speak English | Jamila Lyiscott

Introducing Element of Hip-Hop: Language/AAVE Lesson

I Can Statements:

I can identify the 9 Elements of Hip-Hop. I can analyze the connections between the 9 Elements of Hip-Hop and Writing. I can analyze the connection between More Than Anything Else and Language.

Materials:

9 Elements of Hip-Hop and Writing Flip Book

The 9 Elements of Hip-Hop and Writing Anchor Chart/SMART Notebook File (1/2)

The 9 Elements of Hip-Hop SMART Notebook File: Language

Writer’s Notebook Language Chart

All Falls Down by Kanye West More Than Anything Else

1. Introduce the 9 Elements of Hip-Hop anchor chart.


2. Revisit the elements already learned and talk about observations from the previous day.

3. Open the 9 Elements of Hip-Hop and Writing Anchor Chart/SMART Notebook File, Language.

4. Ask students what they think language has to do with Hip-Hop.

5. Revisit the All Falls Down by Kanye West.

6. Point out the following sentence: You ain’t up on this.

7. Ask the following questions:

a. What does this sentence mean?

b. If someone didn’t understand the meaning of this sentence, how would you explain it to them?

8. Explain to students that this sentence represents the “Language of Hip-Hop” which is sometimes called Street Language or A.A.V.E (African American Vernacular English).

9. Direct students to the images on the SMART Notebook File.

10. Read each image.

A. B. C. D. E.

11. Teacher directs the discussion of (A) and (B) by asking the following questions

a. What is the meaning of “What’s Good?”

b. How can it be used?

c. Can it be used as a greeting or a threat? Can you give examples?

d. What about “What up”?

e. What is the meaning of “What Up? How do you know?

Continue with questioning for (C) and (D).

12. Explain to students that this is A.A.V.E and that students have the power to make the choice of :

a. If and when they should use it (Entrepreneurship/Ownership)

b. How to use A.A.V.E effectively as “voice” in their writing.

13. Explain the meaning of “voice”. Voice: Showing your personality when you are writing. Voice is your “own”. Show this statement on the whiteboard:

No. Person. In. This. World. Has. Voice. Like. You.

14. Talk about this phrase and its meaning. By asking the following questions:

a. What does this statement mean?

b. Is there “voice” in this statement? If so, why?

c. Why are there periods after every word?

d. Is this a way to show voice? If so, why?

e. What message is the author trying to convey?

f. Is this effective? Explain why or why not.

15. Give students chart paper with 3 phrases on the in each row.

16. Put students in groups of 2 and have them analyze how “voice” was used in the sentence. Students write if Hip-Hop Language was used or not.

Phrase

Voice- Can you hear the characters/ author personality in the text?

Hip-Hop Language/ AAVE or Not

Connection to Writing


Nah! You cain’t have none,” Javion mumbled as he stuffed Rolaids in his mouth, believing they were candy.

(Story about my cousin)

Yes. You can hear Javion’s voice. Javion seems a little selfish.

The author uses his/her voice as well. The author is sort of making fun of Javion because he’s stuffing medicine in his mouth like it’s candy/

Both. Javion is using AAVE but the narrator isn’t.

Using the character’s voice makes the writing more interesting. It makes the reader wonder why Javion thinks Rolaids are candy and why the narrator won’t tell him


Children will crowd around me, and I will teach them to read.

(More Than Anything Else)

Yes. You know that Booker is telling his own story and that he is really sure of himself. He knows he will teach children how to read. I can hear how much he wants to read.

No. Booker is not using Hip-Hop Language/AAVE

Using italics may add to the voice of writing. Because the word “them” is italicized, I know Booker is serious about learning how to read so he can be a role-model to children like him.


I woke up like dis!

(Flawless)

Yes. Telling the world she’s beautiful all the time.

Yes. “Dis”

Using AAVE shows how the author feels about herself.


17. Students come back to carpet to talk about findings.

18. Add to flip book adding connections to Element of Language and writing.

Journal Writing/Prompt/ Closing Conversation

19. Show students the image of the grandmother and child.

20. Students make up a story from the perspective of the girl or the mother using the image to create a story.

21. After 20 minutes, pick volunteers to share their writing.

Discuss how writing in the character’s voice helped to add “flava” to their writing

Element of Hip-Hop: EMCEEIN' (RAP)

When most people hear about me using HHBE in my classroom, they automatically think about Rap and think rap is Hip-Hop. While rap is the first and probably most profound of the elements, it is not Hip-Hop. Hip-Hop is the culture. KRS-1 said it best. He states, "Rap is something you do, Hip-Hop is how you live."


When I first began using HHBE in my classroom, rap was the element I started with first and the one most of my students enjoy next to dancing. However, many students quickly realize that writing raps is not an easy task but they do not give up. In 2014, my students were able to go to HeadFirst Recording Studio and record the song they wrote. This was an awesome experience and one that they never have forgotten

I've also generated two graphic organizers to help in writing rhymes. One I use for upper elementary grades and the other, for lower grades. As an educator, I prefer using the graphic organizer for lower grades because of its simplicity.

Big image
"They don't see" video

Introducing Element of Hip-Hop: Rap/Emceein'

I Can Statements:

I can identify the 9 Elements of Hip-Hop.

I can analyze the connections between the 9 Elements of Hip-Hop and Writing.

I can analyze the connection between More Than Anything Else and Rap. Materials:

9 Elements of Hip-Hop and Writing Flip Book

The 9 Elements of Hip-Hop and Writing Anchor Chart/SMART Notebook File (1/2)

The 9 Elements of Hip-Hop SMART Notebook File: Rap Writer’s Notebook More Than Anything Else

Jay Z MTV Quote

Rap-Graphic Organizer

Booker T. Washington Rap Video by Mrs. Clayton-Taylor’s 3rd Grade Class

1. Introduce the 9 Elements of Hip-Hop anchor chart.


2. Revisit the elements already learned and talk about observations from the previous day.

3. Open the 9 Elements of Hip-Hop and Writing Anchor Chart/SMART Notebook File, Rap/ Emceein’.

4. Ask students what they think Rap has to do with Hip-Hop.

5. Show students a sentence written by KRS-1 on white board.

Rap is something you do, Hip-Hop is what you live.

6. Discuss this sentence and its meaning. Inform students that this sentence explains that Rap is an action and has to be performed; while Hip-Hop is the culture we live, using all of the 9 elements.

7. Show the image of Jay-Z rapping on the SMART Notebook File.

8. Show student’s a Jay-Z quote from MTV News:

“I say to write every day because it's like anything else: [You have to] practice," he said. Basketball players play basketball their whole life, they practice every day. It only makes sense. You can only get better. The repetition. The more you do it, the better you do."


9. Ask students the following question:

a. How does rapping’ (emceein’) connect to writing?

b. Jay-Z doesn’t write his lyrics. He is a rapper that freestyles because his raps come from his thoughts. How do you believe Jay-Z was able to become distinguished at freestyling?

c. How does freestyling connect to writing?

d. A lot of people believe rap lyrics are like poetry. Do you believe this or not? Explain why.

e. What is it that makes rap and poetry similar?

f. How does rhyme factor into rap?

10. Show video of student rap video- They Don’t See.

11. After students view the video, ask students how Mrs. Clayton-Taylor’s class used rap.

12. Explain to Students that the rap was used to tell a story in the perspective of Booker T. Washington.

13. Students will use the graphic organizer below entitled, The Hip-Hop Way to Write Rap, to create their own raps about themselves.

14. Teacher and student complete graphic organizer together.

a. Write a sentence (bar) telling about student. Student must boast about themselves!

b. List ALL possible End Rhymes and Slant Rhymes that rhyme with the circled word.

c. End Rhyme: Same Ending

d. Near Rhyme: Sounds the same but not spelled the same.

e. Pick a word that would make the most sense.

f. Complete rhyme with a related line. Making sure to use one of the circled rhyming words.

Journal Writing/Prompt/ Closing Conversation

15. Students go back to their area, creating lyrics about themselves and adding connections to Rap and writing to flip book.

16. After students are finished, they share their “rap” song about themselves.

(K-2) Graphic Organizer for writing rhymes

Big image

Element of Hip-Hop: Entrepreneurship

Big image

Entrepreneurship

When I introduce the element of entrepreneurship, I like to introduce it as students having ownership in how they choose to write the information that they have learned. After this first lesson of ownership, I begin to talk about economics and how many MC's/Rappers are entrepreneurs. This is always a fun lesson, but this year,because of our Assistant Principal, Dr. Carla Kolodey and Director of Economics Educaction, Dr. Abdullah Al-Bahrani from Northern Kentucky University, teaching entrepreneurship was "Lit" (amazing, miraculous, incredible, mind-blowing, awe-inspiring).



During April, which is Financial Literacy month, my students were able to travel to Northern Kentucky University and learn about entrepreneurship and meet author, Ty Allen Jackson.


4th and 5th grade students learned about entrepreneurship and financial literacy by reading the book, Danny Dollar Millionaire Extraordinaire by Ty Allen Jackson.. Students wrote a song entitled, Young Tycoon and also created a graffiti board of financial terms.

Also, students learned about young entrepreneurs and talked about ways they could become entrepreneurs as well.

Shark Tank Update: Mo's Bows
BeeSweet Lemonade Featured on CBS This Morning News
Big image

Entrepreneurship Coordinators-Dr. Carla Kolodey and Dr. Abdullah Al-Bahrani

Big image

Ty Allen Jackson talking to Phillis Wheatley Students

Big image

Students performing young tycoon at NKU Econ Beats

Wheatley Elementary Econ Beats at Northern Kentucky University

Introducing Entrepreneurship Lesson

Theme: It’s Bigger Than, Hip-Hop (Dead Prez)

I Can Statements:

I can identify the 9 Elements of Hip-Hop. I can analyze the connections between the 9 Elements of Hip-Hop and Writing. I can analyze the connection between More Than Anything and Entrepreneurship (Ownership).

Materials:

9 Elements of Hip-Hop and Writing Flip Book

The 9 Elements of Hip-Hop and Writing Anchor Chart/SMART Notebook File (1/2)

The 9 Elements of Hip-Hop SMART Notebook File: Entrepreneurship

Writer’s Notebook More Than Anything Else

Elements of Hip-Hop/Entrepreneurship/Writing Chart Book: Jay-Z iPAD video: Mikaila Ulmer/Mo's Bow's

1. Introduce the 9 Elements of Hip-Hop anchor chart.


2. Revisit the elements already learned and talk about observations from the previous day.

3. Open the 9 Elements of Hip-Hop and Writing Anchor Chart/SMART Notebook File-Entrepreneurship.

4. Students will connect Entrepreneurship to all the elements of Hip-Hop and analyze how Booker T Washington showed Entrepreneurship/Ownership in the text.

5. Display the word, “Entrepreneurship” on a piece of chart paper. Ask students if they have ever heard of the word, “Entrepreneurship”?

6. Explain to students that meaning of Entrepreneurship:

Entrepreneurship: the activity of setting up a business or businesses to make a profit.

7. Ask students if they think they could be entrepreneurs?

8. Take a survey. Write results on SMART Board.

9. Show students the book, Hip-Hop Icon: Jay-Z that was read yesterday.

10. Reread page 7 and ask students: “How was Jay-Z able to become an entrepreneur right after his father left him and his mother?

11. Jay-Z states in this text, that as a kid his friends wanted him to write rhymes for them. He agreed and used this opportunity to make money for him and mother.

12. Have a classroom discussion explaining “Ownership” and how Ownership relates to Entrepreneurship.

13. Show the following image on the SMART Board.

14. Students watch video of Mikayla Ulmer on iPAD

15. Pass out iPads and chart.

A. B.

Image

What did this person do to show ownership?


A-Mikaila Ulmer- Video

Mikaila went on a T.V show and won money to start her own business.

She used her grandmother’s recipe and gives a portions of the proceeds back.

She presented her information by herself.


B- Booker T. Washington- I got to find him, that brown face of hope. I look everywhere. Finally, I find that brown face of hope.

Even though Booker was tired from working, he found the man so that he could teach him how to read.


16. Students come back to carpet and explain their charts.

Journal Writing/Prompt/ Closing Conversation

17. Redo survey to see if results differ. Even if results do not differ, ask the following questions:

a. Did your feeling change about entrepreneurship? Why or Why not.

b. How can you begin to show “ownership” now?

c. What things could do at home, school, or in your neighborhood?

d. How does writing and ownership relate to one another?

e. How could you show the Element of Entrepreneurship (Ownership) in Writing?

f. How can you use it in this iRAP program?

18. As students answer questions, fill out the last page of the 9 Elements of Hip-Hop and Writing Flip Book.

19. Journal Prompt:

Write how you will show the Element of Entrepreneurship in iRAP.

What Element of Hip-Hop will you choose to show the information you’ve learned and why?

20. Students write and share.

21. Reflect and share learning for the day.