Cynthia Rylant

Created By: Keegan Ward

Central Idea Statment

In 1979, in Huntington, West Virginia, Cynthia Rylant wrote her first book because she wanted to do something useful and meaningful.

Summary of Research

Cynthia Rylant was born in Hopewell VA., in June 1954. When she was only at the age of 4 her parents got divorced and she went to go live with her grandparents, when her mother was attending nursing school. She never really wanted to be a writer, but that all changed when she took a English class at the school of Morris Harvey College. (Today known as University of Charleston) She now thinks that this is the best thing ever, because she is doing something useful and meaningful.

Summary of Synthesized Information

Writing Style--- Cynthia Rylant has a writing style of long sentences, lots of dialogue, and figurative language. I feel this way because of how there is always a piece of dialogue on a page, and it adds to the story. She also has long sentences, I think that this really adds to the story, because there are many descriptive words that makes many readers want to read more. And lastly, the figurative language. There is so much figurative language you can’t even count, in my opinion this is something that is added to the story. These are just a few of the things that Cynthia Rylant uses in her books that she writes.



Tone--- The tone that Cynthia Rylant creates in her books is happy, then in about the middle book it goes to a depressed feeling. I feel this way because in the book, The Old Lady Who Named Things the old lady found a dog, and would come back everyday tell one day when it didn't come. And that made her depressed. I feel like all books need to have something that makes them happy then get it taken away from them, and then the thing comes back. Lastly, in most of her books right when the character is about to give up, or is right at the stage where they are the most happy, something is has to go wrong, and/or right. Those were only a few reasons why Cynthia Rylant has a tone of happy, the depressed.

Worked Cited

"The 1990s Newbery Medal Winners Missing May Cynthia Rylant Biography." Cynthia Rylant Biography. Web. 04 Mar. 2015. <http://www.cliffsnotes.com/literature/n/the-1990s-newbery-medal-winners/missing-may/cynthia-rylant-biography>.


"Cynthia Rylant (1954-) Biography - Personal, Addresses, Career, Honors Awards, Writings, Adaptations, Sidelights." - Illustrated, York, Review, and Book. Web. 02 Mar. 2015. <http://biography.jrank.org/pages/1628/Rylant-Cynthia-1954.html>.


"Cynthia Rylant Background Information for Teachers and Parents | BrainPOP Educators." BrainPOP Educators Cynthia Rylant Background Information for Teachers and Parents Comments. Web. 04 Mar. 2015. <http://www.brainpop.com/educators/community/lesson-plan/cynthia-rylant-background-information-for-teachers-and-parents/>.


"Guide to Resources for the Study of West Virginia Authors and Appalachian Literary Traditions." Biography of Cynthia Rylant. Web. 01 Mar. 2015. <http://www.wvwc.edu/library/wv_authors/cynthia_rylant.html>.


"The Official Website of Cynthia Rylant." The Official Website of Cynthia Rylant. Web. 02 Mar. 2015. <http://www.cynthiarylant.com/>.


Rylant, Cynthia, and Stephen Gammell. The Relatives Came. New York: Bradbury, 1985. Print.

Rylant, Cynthia. The Bookshop Dog. New York: Blue Sky/Scholastic, 1996. Print.


Rylant, Cynthia, and Kathryn Brown. The Old Woman Who Named Things. San Diego: Harcourt Brace, 1996. Print.

Youtube Video

Cynthia Rylant by Vanessa Marie