1. LIFE AS A VASSAL

YOUR KNIGHT IN SHINING ARMOUR AS ARRIVE

2. KNIGHT-

A VASSAL OR A LESSER NOBLE WHO FOUGHT ON BEHALF OF HIS LORD IN RETURN FOR LAND

2. LORD- / 2. CHIVALRY- / 2. SERF

A NOBLE WHO OWNED LAND

THE KNIGHTS CODE OF HONOR

A PEASANT WHO LIVED AND WORKED ON LAND OF A LORD OR VASSAL

3. VASSAL / KNIGHT

The most significant military figure of the European Middle Ages was the knight. Knighthood emerged as a distinct order in around the year 1000, and the knight came to be defined as a warrior mounted on a horse and dressed in a suit of armor. The word knight is derived from the Old English word cniht, the equivalent of the Latin word caballarius, meaning “horseman.” At first a figure of almost humble status, the knight gradually obtained noble rank. In time, elaborate rules of knightly behavior and duties emerged and were enshrined in the literature of the period. ( Britannica school )
At the age of 21, if he had acquitted himself well as page and squire, he was made a knight. In its earliest forms, the dubbing, or adoubement, was a relatively simple rite involving the bestowal of arms and rank by a high-ranking noble. As the ideology of knighthood evolved, so did the ceremony. The knighting ceremony became increasingly elaborate, involved solemn vows, and acquired religious sanction. (Britannica school)

After the festivities attending the conferring of knighthood, the young knight was free to go where he pleased. As a knight-errant he appears in the pages of medieval literature seeking a fair maiden in need of a champion or a strange knight with whom to joust. The knight, however, most often returned to his father’s castle or joined the following of some great lord to serve as his vassal. At times as well, the knight fought in the armies of the Crusades in the Holy Land or of those fighting in the Christian reconquest of Spain.

By the later 12th and 13th centuries when the rules of knightly behavior had been worked out, the knight was guided by the watchwords of “Religion, Honor, and Courtesy.” In addition to fighting bravely in battle, he was expected to be pious, to remain loyal to his lord and lady, to preserve his personal honor, and to protect women, the poor, and the weak. The ideal knight is thus described by the poet Chaucer: “And though he was valorous, he was prudent and as meek as a maid of his bearing. In all his life he never yet spake discourteously but was truly a perfect gentle knight.” The gallantry and honor expected of knights came to be called chivalry, from chevalier, the French word for “knight.” In the 14th and 15th centuries, chivalry was associated increasingly with aristocratic display and public ceremony, particularly in jousting tournaments, rather than with service in the field.

With the rise of the longbow and the crossbow, which could be used to wound or kill someone from a distance, and the invention of gunpowder and cannon rendering useless the feudal castle, the knight in armor passed out of existence. Knighthood then came to be merely a title of honor for persons who served the king or country

4.

The word knight is derived from the Old English word cniht, the equivalent of the Latin word caballarius, meaning “horseman.”

At the age of 21, if he had acquitted himself well as page and squire, he was made a knight. In its earliest forms, the dubbing, or adoubement, was a relatively simple rite involving the bestowal of arms and rank by a high-ranking noble.

5.

what kind of Armour did knights wear

5.

what were the names of the parts of a knights Armour
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7.

I feel that being a knight was a lot of work, but it had to be fun so times

8. Andrew S. Jones