Skellig- The Beginning...

Chapters 1-7

Rasputin

Rasputin was born on the 10th of January, 1869 and died on 16th December, 1916. He was a Russian mystic with an influence in the later days of Russia's Romanov dynasty. He was believed to have been a faith healer. Rasputin in the meantime became a controversial figure, leading a scandalous personal life. Rasputin is viewed by most historians today as a debauched man. He played an important role in the lives of the Tsar Nicholas II, his wife, the Tsarina Alexandra and their son, the Tsarevitch Alexei, who was a hemophilia patient and suffered from a lot of pain. Due to Rasputin's influence over the Tsar and Tsarina during World War I, he became a focus of accusations of unpatriotic influence at court. The unpopular Tsarina was of German descent, and Rasputin was accused of being a spy in German employ. Nobles in influential positions clamored for his removal from the court of the tsar.



Icarus

According to the Greek mythology, Icarus was the son of Daedalus. To escape from Crete with his father, Daedalus made wings for Icarus and himself. Daedalus warned him not to fly too close to the sun or the sea. Icarus took no notice of the warning and flew too close to the sun and the wax melted and he fell into the Aegean and drowned. Heracles buried his body and then named the Aegean Sea after him.

daedalus

According to Greek mythology, he was the father of Icarus and was an Athenian inventor who built the labyrinth of Minos. To escape Crete, he fashioned wings for himself and his son Icarus out of feathers and wax. Icarus, who flew to close to the Sun and drowned in the Aegean Sea and was buried when washed on the shore by Heracles.

References

Rasputin:

Skellig-the Beginning... n.d, accessed 26 October 2012, http://www.biographybase.com/biography/rasputin_grigori.html.

Icarus:

Skellig-the beginning.. n.d., accessed 26 October 2012,

<http://www.audioenglish.net/dictionary/icarus.htm>.

Daedalus:

Skellig-the beginning.. n.d, accessed 26 October 2012, <http://www.ancientlibrary.com/smith-bio/0935.html>.