Mexican Comida

Juan Splawski, Pedro Steenbock, David Johnson

Breakfast

Mexican breakfast, or “desayuno” is usually one of the lightest meals of the day. Some Mexicans don’t even have breakfast. But, if they do, they usually eat a light pastry like a churro, or toast (some kind of grain). They could also have fruits, and coffee are very popular in Mexico. Some popular dishes for breakfast are Huevos Rancheros (Eggs on top of a tortilla with salsa), Breakfast Burrito (Rolled up tortilla with meat and eggs), and others.
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Lunch

Lunch is usually the most important meal of the day in Mexico. A base meal is usually starting with a soup or salad. Some of the most main soups could be pozola (pork and corn based soup), birria (goat soup). Then, they move to their main course, some dishes may include Tortas (hollow rolls stuffed with meat filling, cheese, etc.), Quesadillas (Tortillas with different mixtures/fillings). After the main meal, they could have dessert. Some desserts include Sopapillas (Fried chips layered with sugar), Flan (Thick, Creamy Custard), and even more varieties! People in Mexico could take 2-3 hours off work, and they would take a siesta (rest).
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Dinner/Snack

Mexican dinner is usually very light. Moving towards either a light main course or snack. For snacks, they could either have leftovers, food from the market, or some other snacks like tortillas chips, Adobadas (Potato Chips), Salsagheti (chile covered pasta), and more. They also have candies like Glorias (Carmel Nut Legs), Limon 7 (lemon lime sweet powder), Verto Mango (mango flavored lollipop), and many other choices.
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Holiday Foods

Some dishes are based on the amount of people at the festival or holidays. Big meals could contain lots of dishes like Tostadas (A mix of meats, sauces, and vegetables wrapped in a corn husk), Tacos (folded tortillas with meat or other filling). They also have lots of desserts. Some of the most famous ones are trece lece (A triple layer milk cake), churros (a spanish pastry), and others.
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Preparation/Ingredients

The mother and daughters of the family usually prepare the meals for the day, but the family usually eats all together. Some main ingredients are meat, tortillas, cheese, beans, vegetables, and many more. Their are many other ingredients that are used to make a mexican dish. Some of the most main ingredients used are tomatoes (which can be used for making sauces and use it as a vegetable), corn (which can be used to make tortillas and as a veggie), ground beef (which is a huge basic meat for many mexican dishes), and many more!
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Farming

Not a lot of land can be used for Mexico farming. The land can increase in height very often, and it is said that only 1/5 of Mexico could be used as farming land. But some of the climate can be hot and moist, so some spots are perfect for farming. Mexico produces a lot of foods, and they create lots of grain crops. Some of the crops include Corn, Tomatoes, Sugarcane, Wheat, Chilies, Green Peppers, and many more. They also produce a lot of fruits like Oranges, Limes, Mangos, and Bananas.
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Works Cited and Pictures

Works Cited

“Agriculture.” Calstatela. California State University, n.d. Web. 25 Nov. 2014. <http://instructional1.calstatela.edu/psemrau/Mexico/economy/agriculture.htm>.

Cabral, Javier. “Mexican Snack Foods.” Saveur. N.p., 16 Aug. 2012. Web. 4 Dec. 2014. <http://www.saveur.com/article/Kitchen/Mexican-Snack-Food>.

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“Essential Mexican Food Ingredients.” Sunset. Sunset Food and Wine, n.d. Web. 3 Dec. 2014. <http://www.sunset.com/food-wine/flavors-of-the-west/mexican-food>.

“Harvesting Herbs.” Rodale Institute. N.p., 31 Jan. 2005. Web. 4 Dec. 2014. <http://newfarm.org/international/pan-am_don/feb05/mx_organic/index.shtml>.

“Homemade Tortilla Chips.” Simply Recipes. Simply Recipes, 2 May 2013. Web. 3 Dec. 2014. <http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/how_to_make_homemade_tortilla_chips/>.

“Mexican Food.” Lapicosita Mexican Food. Lapicosita, 2014. Web. 3 Dec. 2014. <http://lapicositamexicanfood.com/>.

Mexican Food Traditions. Vol. 1. N.p.: Milwaukee Urban Gardens, 2011. Print.

Meyer, Michael C., ed. “Mexico.” Britannica. N.p., 10 Oct. 2014. Web. 4 Dec. 2014. <http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/379167/Mexico/27387/Demographic-trends>.

“6 Healthy Food Ingredients.” Care 2. N.p., 11 Dec. 2012. Web. 3 Dec. 2014. <http://www.care2.com/greenliving/6-healthy-ingredients-in-mexican-food.html>.

“Spanish Eating Customs.” Don Quijote. don Quijote Spanish school, n.d. Web. 25 Nov. 2014. <http://www.donquijote.org/culture/spain/society/food/eating-customs>.

“Tres Leche Cake.” Clements Pastry. N.p., n.d. Web. 3 Dec. 2014. <http://www.clementspastry.com/wholesale/premiere/tres-leches/>.

“XOCO Churros with Mexican Hot Chocolate.” Epicurious. N.p., n.d. Web. 3 Dec. 2014. <http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/XOCO-Churros-with-Mexican-Hot-Chocolate-395109>.