The Muscular System

By: Kaitlyn Rodysill, and Kristen Foy

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Major Organs

- skeletal muscle tissue

- blood vessels

- tendons

- nerves

Levels of Organization:

Muscle Cells

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Interesting Fact

Skeletal muscle tissue, the most common kind of muscle tissue in humans and other large animals, has striations, or grooves, that mark out each individual muscle cell. These cells, sometimes called muscle fibers, extend the length of the muscle.

Muscle Tissue

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Interesting Fact

Muscle tissue is made of "excitable" cells that are capable of contraction. Of all of the different tissue types (muscle, epithelial, connective, and nervous), muscle tissue is the most abundant in most animals.

Human Heart

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Interesting Fact

Every day, your heart beats about 100,000 times, sending 2,000 gallons of blood surging through your body. Although it’s no bigger than your fist, your heart has the mighty job of keeping blood flowing through the 60,000 miles of blood vessels that feed your organs and tissues. Any damage to the heart or its valves can reduce that pumping power, forcing the heart to work harder just to keep up with the body’s demand for blood.

Muscular System

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Interesting Fact

The 650 muscles in the body not only support movement — controlling walking, talking, sitting, standing, eating and other daily functions that people consciously perform — but also help to maintain posture and circulate blood and other substances throughout the body, among other functions.

Organism

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Interesting Fact

The muscular System aids in movement, blood flow and other bodily functions. There are three types of muscle: skeletal muscle which is connected to bone and helps with voluntary movement, smooth muscle which is found inside organs and helps to move substances through organs, and cardiac muscle which is found in the heart and helps pump blood.

Homeostasis

The muscular system maintains homeostasis by a number of different ways. An example to explain homeostasis of the skeletal muscle is when you are cold, you start to shiver. Your muscles generate heat. Because the muscles generate heat, this ceases the shivering when they provide heat. This is homeostasis in the skeletal muscles. Your body must maintain the average temperature and when your body shivers it is because your body has dropped
below that temperature. For your body to get back up to that temperature it uses homeostasis of the skeletal muscles by generating heat to warm you up.
Essentially, if our body could not do this, we would freeze to death. The
opposite of this is when your body has too much heat, you begin to sweat, and
this sweat cools the body down back to 37° therefore maintaining homeostasis and
balancing out the body’s temperature. When disease or illness breaks the homeostasis, the system works to stabilize itself back to a state of homeostasis. Sometimes it requires medicine, extra fluids, and/or rest to help.

Pulled Muscle

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A stretching or tearing of a muscle or a tissue connecting muscle to bone (tendon).

Heart Clot

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Also called a thrombus. The process by which a blood clot forms is termed coagulation. A blood clot, or thrombus, is stationary within a vessel or the heart. If it moves from that location through the bloodstream, it is referred to as an embolus.

Interaction

The muscular system interacts with the circulatory system because the heart is the pump that moves the blood through all the vessels. This oxygenates the cells to remove CO2. Muscles connect to the skeleton and they contract and move the skeleton along. The skeletal system is made up of cartilage and calcified bone that work together. They help the process of movement happen in a smoother manner. The respiratory system requires the muscular system so that it can expand and contract to allow the lungs to breathe.

Circulatory System

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Skeletal System

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Respiratory System

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